Etymology
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nullifidian (n.)

"one of no faith or religion," 1560s, from Latin nulli-, combining form of nullus "no" (see null) + fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). As an adjective from 1620s.

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Catholicism (n.)
"faith and practice of the Catholic church," 1610s, from Catholic + -ism.
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Christless (adj.)

"having no faith in Christ, unchristian," 1650s, from Christ + -less.

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truce (n.)
"mutually agreed-upon temporary intermission of hostilities," early 13c., triws, variant of trewes, originally plural of trewe "faith, assurance of faith, covenant, treaty," from Old English treow "faith, truth, fidelity; pledge, promise, agreement, treaty," from Proto-Germanic *treuwo- (source also of Old Frisian triuwe, Middle Dutch trouwe, Dutch trouw, Old High German triuwa, German treue, Gothic triggwa "faith, faithfulness"), from PIE root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast." Related to true (adj.). The Germanic word was borrowed into Late Latin as tregua, hence French trève, Italian tregua.
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apostatize (v.)
"abandon one.s faith, principles, or church," 1610s, from Late Latin apostatizare, earlier apostatare, from apostata "one who forsakes his religion or faith" (see apostate (n.)). Related: Apostatized; apostatizing. The past participle form apostazied is attested from late 14c.
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Aladdin 
name of a hero in stories from the "Arabian Nights," from Arabic Ala' al Din, literally "height (or nobility) of the faith," from a'la "height" + din "faith, creed." Figurative use often in reference to his magic lamp, by which difficulties are overcome, or his cave full of riches.
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trow (v.)
Old English treowan "to trust in, believe, hope, be confident; persuade, suggest; make true; be faithful (to), confederate with," from treow "faith, belief," from Proto-Germanic *treuwaz "having or characterized by good faith" (source also of Old Saxon truon, Old Frisian trouwa, Dutch vertrouwen "trust," Old High German triuwen, German trauen "hope, believe, trust"), "having or characterized by good faith," from PIE *drew-o-, a suffixed form of the root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast."
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creed (n.)

Old English creda "article or statement of Christian belief, confession of faith," from Latin credo "I believe" (see credo). Broadening 17c. to mean "a statement of belief on any subject." Meaning "what is believed, accepted doctrine" is from 1610s. Related: Creedal.

A Creed, or Rule of Faith, or Symbol, is a confession of faith for public use, or a form of words setting forth with authority certain articles of belief, which are regarded by the framers as necessary for salvation, or at least for the well-being of the Christian Church. [Philip Schaff, "The Creeds of Christendom," 1877]
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solifidian (n.)
"one who believes in salvation by faith alone" (based on Luther's translation of Romans iii.28), 1590s, Reformation coinage from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)) + fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). As an adjective from c. 1600. Related: Solifidianism
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Muslim (n.)

"one who professes Islam," 1610s, from Arabic muslim "one who submits" (to the faith), from root of aslama "he resigned." Related to Islam. From 1777 as an adjective.

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