Etymology
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dummkopf (n.)

"stupid person," 1809 (dom cop, in Washington Irving), from German dummkopf, literally "dumb head;" see dumb (adj.) + cup (n.).

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Bella 
fem. proper name, from Italian bella "fair," from Latin bella, fem. of bellus "beautiful, fair" (see belle). In some cases short for Isabella (see Isabel).
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fairground (n.)
also fair-ground, 1741, from fair (n.) + ground (n.).
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fairing (n.)
"piece added for streamlining purposes," 1865, from fair (v.) a ship-building word meaning "to make 'fair' or level, adjust, make regular, correct curvatures," from fair (adj.).
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specious (adj.)

late 14c., "pleasing to the sight, fair," from Latin speciosus "good-looking, beautiful, fair," also "showy, pretended, plausible, specious," from species "appearance, form, figure, beauty" (see species). Meaning "seemingly desirable, reasonable or probable, but not really so; superficially fair, just, or correct" in English is first recorded 1610s. Related: Speciously; speciosity; speciousness.

Specious is superficially fair, just, or correct, appearing well at first view but easily proved unsound. Plausible is applied to that which pleases the ear or the superficial judgment, but will not bear severe examination. [Century Dictionary, 1895] 
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dinkum (n.)

1888, "hard work," Australian slang, of unknown origin, perhaps from Lincolnshire dialect. Adjectival meaning "honest, genuine" is attested from 1916. Phrase fair dinkum "fair play" is attested by 1894.

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bel (adj.)
"beautiful," early 14c., from Old French bel, belle "beautiful, fair, fine," from Latin bellus "fair, fine, beautiful" (see belle). "Naturalized in ME.; but after 1600 consciously French" [OED].
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belvedere (n.)
"raised turret or open story atop a house," 1590s, from Italian belvedere, literally "a fair sight," from bel, bello "beautiful" (from Latin bellus "beautiful, fair;" see belle) + vedere "a view, sight" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Pronunciation perhaps influenced by the French form of the word. So called because it was used for viewing the grounds.
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zebu (n.)
Asiatic ox, 1774, from French zebu, ultimately of Tibetan origin. First shown in Europe at the Paris fair of 1752.
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Mayfair 
fashionable district of London, developed 18c., built on Brook fields, where an annual May fair had been held 17c.
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