Etymology
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bold-face (n.)
also boldface, in typography, "having a thick or fat face," 1845, from bold (adj.) + face (n.). In reference to types, bold (adj.) is attested from 1790, perhaps from its secondary sense "easily visible, striking to the eye."
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face-off (n.)
also faceoff, 1886 in sports (hockey, etc., originally lacrosse), from verbal phrase in a sports sense, attested from 1867 (see face (v.) + off (adv.)); the off perhaps is based on stand-off or similar constructions.
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horse-faced (adj.)
"having a long, rough, ugly face," 1670s, from horse (n.) + face (n.).
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two-faced (adj.)
also two faced, "deceitful," 1610s; see two + face (n.).
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faceless (adj.)
1560s, from face (n.) + -less. Related: Facelessly; facelessness.
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facing (adj.)
1560s, "audacious," present-participle adjective from face (v.). From 1849 as "that is opposite to."
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facebook (n.)
directory listing names and headshots, by 1983, originally among U.S. college students, from face (n.) + book (n.). The social networking Web site of that name (with capital F-) dates from 2004.
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in facie curiae 
"before the court," legal Latin, from ablative of Latin facies "form, face" (see face (n.)). + genitive of curia "court" (see curia).
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outface (v.)

1520s, "to confront boldly, stare down and shame;" 1570s, "confront fearlessly," from out- + face (v.). Related: Outfaced; outfacing.

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dogface (n.)

"soldier in the U.S. Army," especially an infantryman, by 1941, from dog (n.) + face (n.). Said to have been originally a contemptuous name given by the Marines.

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