Etymology
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matting (n.1)

"process of making mats," 1720, from mat (n.1). Meaning "fabric of coarse material for mats" is from 1748.

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Henrietta 
fem. proper name, from French Henriette, fem. diminutive of Henri (see Henry). In late 19c. a type of light dress fabric.
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blue-jeans (n.)
from 1843 as a type of fabric; see blue (adj.1) + jean. As short for blue-jeans trousers, from 1878.
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grogram (n.)

coarse, stiff textile fabric, 1560s, from French gros grain "coarse grain or texture;" see gross (adj.) + grain (n.).

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sateen (n.)

"fabric having a glossy surface resembling satin," 1835, a variant of satin (q.v.), perhaps influenced by velveteen, where the ending is a variant of -ine (1).

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damask (n.)

mid-13c., "Damascus;" late 14c., Damaske, "costly textile fabric woven in elaborate patterns," literally "cloth from Damascus," the Syrian city noted for fabric; see Damascus. From c. 1600 as "a pink color," a reference to the Damask rose, which is native to that region. As an adjective, "woven with figures," 1640s. Related: Damasked.

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check (n.2)

"pattern of squares in alternating colors," c. 1400, short for checker (n.1). As a fabric having such a pattern from 1610s.

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challis (n.)

type of fine fabric for ladies' dresses, 1840, of unknown origin, perhaps from the surname. Said to have been first manufactured at Norwich c. 1832.

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worsted (n.)
woolen fabric made from twisted yarn, late 13c., from Worstead (Old English Wurðestede), town in Norfolk where the cloth originally was made.
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woof (n.1)
"weft, texture, fabric," Old English owef, from o- "on" + wefan "to weave" (see weave). With unetymological w- by influence of warp or weft.
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