Etymology
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inexpressible (adj.)

1620s, from in- (1) "not" + expressible (see express (v.)). Inexpressibles "trousers" is from 1790. Related: Inexpressibly.

I have retain'd the word BREECHES, as they are known by no other name amongst country folk.--The change from vulgarity to refinement, in cities and towns, has introduced other appellations; there they are generally called SMALL CLOTHES, but some ladies of high rank and extreme delicacy call them INEXPRESSIBLES. [footnote in "Poems Miscellaneous and Humorous," by Edward Nairne, Canterbury, 1791]

Inexpressibles is the earliest recorded and thus seems to have begotten the trend: Unmentionables (1806); indispensibles (1820); ineffables (1823); unutterables (1826); innominables (1827); and inexplicables (1829) followed.

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Amex 
1970, contraction of American Express, a trademark registered in U.S. 1950 by American Express Co., originally an express mail service. Its credit card dates from 1958.
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shrug (n.)
a shoulder motion meant to express indifference, want of an answer, etc., 1590s, from shrug (v.).
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phrase (v.)

"to put into a phrase, express by a particular phrase," 1560s; see phrase (n.). Related: Phrased; phrasing.

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gesture (n.)
early 15c., "manner of carrying the body," from Medieval Latin gestura "bearing, behavior, mode of action," from Latin gestus "gesture, carriage, posture" (see gest). Restricted sense of "a movement of the body or a part of it, intended to express a thought or feeling," is from 1550s; figurative sense of "action undertaken in good will to express feeling" is from 1916.
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emote (v.)

"portray or express emotion," especially theatrically, 1909, American English, back-formation from emotion. Related: Emoted; emoting.

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formulate (v.)
"to express in a formula," 1837, from formula + -ate (2). Won out over formulize (1842); formularize (1845). Related: Formulated; formulating.
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heigh-ho (interj.)
c. 1400 as part of the refrain of a song; by 1550s as an exclamation to express yawning, sighing, etc.; see hey.
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complimentary (adj.)

1620s, "intended to express or convey a compliment," from compliment (n.) + -ary. In later use loosely meaning "free of charge."

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request (v.)

1530s, "ask (someone) to (do something), express desire for something to be done;" 1560s, "express a wish or desire, ask to be allowed to do something," from request (n.) or from French requester, "ask again, request, reclaim," from requeste. The older verb was Middle English requeren (14c.), from Old French requerre and directly from Latin requiare. Related: Requested; requesting.

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