Etymology
Advertisement
misbetide (v.)

"have bad fortune, experience defeat," c. 1400, from mis- (1) + betide. Now obsolete.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
telecommute (v.)

by 1974 (as a hypothetical experience), from tele- + commute. Related: Telecommuted. Compare telecommuting.

Related entries & more 
thrill (n.)

"a shivering, exciting feeling," 1670s, from thrill (v.). Meaning "a thrilling experience" is attested from 1936.

Related entries & more 
inexperienced (adj.)

"lacking the knowledge or skill gained by experience," 1620s, past-participle adjective from inexperience.

Related entries & more 
misadventure (n.)

"an unfortunate experience, a bad experience, ill-luck, calamity," c. 1300, misaventure, from Old French mesaventure (12c.) "accident, mishap," from mesavenir "to turn out badly;" see mis- (2) + adventure (n.) in the older sense of "that which happens by chance, fortune, luck." The spelling with -d- became regular after c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
preconception (n.)

"conception or opinion formed in advance of experience or actual knowledge," 1620s, from pre- "before" + conception. Related: Preconceptions.

Related entries & more 
experimental (adj.)

mid 15c., "having experience," from experiment (n.) + -al (1). Meaning "based on experiment" is from 1560s. Meaning "for the sake of experiment" is from 1792.

Related entries & more 
solvitur ambulando 

an appeal to practical experience for a solution or proof, Latin, literally "(the problem) is solved by walking," originally in reference to the proof by Diogenes the Cynic of the possibility of motion.

Related entries & more 
inexpert (adj.)

mid-15c., from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + expert (adj.), or else from Old French inexpert or directly from Latin inexpertus "without experience, unpracticed; untried, untested." Related: Inexpertly.

Related entries & more 
expert (n.)

early 15c., "person wise through experience," from expert (adj.). The word reappeared 1825 in the legal sense, "person who, by virtue of special acquired knowledge or experience on a subject, presumably not within the knowledge of men generally, may testify in a court of justice to matters of opinion thereon, as distinguished from ordinary witnesses, who can in general testify only to facts" [Century Dictionary].

Related entries & more 

Page 2