Etymology
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unmoved (adj.)
late 14c., "not affected by emotion or excitement," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of move (v.). Meaning "fixed in position" is from mid-15c.
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exciting (adj.)
1811, "causing disease," present-participle adjective from excite (v.). Sense of "causing excitement" is from 1826. Related: Excitingly.
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rut (n.2)

"periodically recurring sexual excitement in animals; animal mating season" (originally of deer), early 15c., from Old French rut, ruit, from Late Latin rugitum (nominative rugitus) "a bellowing, a roaring," from past participle of Latin rugire "to bellow" (from PIE imitative root *reu-). If so, the notion is of the noise made by deer at the time of sexual excitement. The noun rut "roar of the sea" (1630s) in Scottish and persisting in New England dialect is of uncertain connection.

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aglow (adj.)

"in a glow, glowing," 1817 (in Coleridge), from a- (1) + glow (v.). Figurative sense of "flushed with pleasurable excitement" is from 1830.

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titillation (n.)

early 15c., "pleasing excitement," from Latin titillationem (nominative titillatio) "a tickling," noun of action from past-participle stem of titillare "to tickle," a word imitative of giggling.

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pucker (n.)

1726, "a drawing or gathering into folds or wrinkles," from pucker (v.). In 18c.-19c. sometimes also in a figurative sense, "state of agitation, condition of excitement" (1741).

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coolness (n.)

Old English colnesse "a moderate degree of cold, somewhat low temperature;" see cool (adj.) + -ness. Figurative sense of "absence of mental confusion or excitement" is from 1650s; that of "absence of warm affection" is from 1670s; that of "quiet, unabashed impudence" is by 1751.

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barmy (adj.)
1530s, "frothing, covered with barm;" see barm + -y (2). Figurative sense of "excited, flighty, bubbling with excitement" is from c. 1600. Meaning "foolish" (1892) is probably an alteration of balmy (q.v.).
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frantic (adj.)
mid-14c., "insane," unexplained variant of Middle English frentik (see frenetic). Compare franzy, dialectal form of frenzy. Transferred meaning "affected by wild excitement" is from late 15c. Of the adverbial forms, frantically (1749) is later than franticly (1540s).
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excitable (adj.)

"susceptible or prone to excitement, capable of being excited, easily stirred up or stimulated," c. 1600, from excite + -able. Late Latin had excitabilis, but it meant "inciting, animating." Related: Excitably; excitability.

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