Etymology
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programmer (n.)
1890, "event planner," agent noun from program (v.). Meaning "person who programs computers" is attested from 1948.
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narrative (n.)

"a tale, a story, a connected account of the particulars of an event or series of incidents," 1560s, from French narrative and from narrative (adj.).

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cover-up (n.)

also coverup, "means or act of concealing" some event or activity, 1922, from the verbal phrase (1872), from cover (v.) + up (adv.).

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spectate (v.)
"to attend (a sporting event, etc.) to watch, not participate," 1929, back-formation from spectator. Related: Spectated; spectating. Related: Spectation.
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omen (n.)

"casual event or occurrence supposed to portend good or evil," 1580s, from Latin omen "foreboding, augury," according to Varro from Old Latin osmen; a word of unknown origin.

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Ascot 
village near Windsor, Berkshire, literally "eastern cottage." The site of fashionable horse race meetings, hence its use attributively for clothes suitable for the event; especially a type of tie (1889).
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hegira (n.)
flight of Muhammad from Mecca to Medina (July 16, 622 C.E.), the event from which the Islamic calendar reckons, 1580s, from Medieval Latin hegira, from Arabic hijrah "departure," from hajara "to depart."
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run-up (n.)

1834, "an act of running upward," from verbal phrase (late 14c.), from run (v.) + up (adv.). Extended sense "period of time or sequence of events proceeding some important event" is from 1966.

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mistime (v.)

late Old English mistimian "to happen amiss" (of an event); see mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + time (v.). Meaning "not to time properly, say or do inappropriately" is from late 14c. Related: Mistimed; mistiming.

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fatalist (n.)
1640s, adherent of the philosophical doctrine that all things are determined by fate; from fatal + -ist. General sense of "one who accepts every condition and event as inevitable" is from 1734.
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