Etymology
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Avar 
one of a Turkic people who made incursions in southeastern Europe 6c.-9c. Related: Avars.
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zebu (n.)
Asiatic ox, 1774, from French zebu, ultimately of Tibetan origin. First shown in Europe at the Paris fair of 1752.
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Galicia 
region in Central Europe, perhaps ultimately from Lithuanian galas "end, peak," in reference to the Carpathian Mountains which rise there, or from the root of Gaul. The region in northwestern Spain of the same name is from the ancient Roman province of Gallaecia, which is perhaps from the Celtic root cala "watercourse," or else it, too, might be from the root of Gaul. Related: Galician (1749 of Spain, 1835 of Eastern Europe).
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trilateral (adj.)
1650s, from Late Latin trilaterus "three-sided;" see tri- + lateral. The Trilateral Commission (representing Japan, the U.S., and Europe) was founded 1973. Related: Trilateralism; trilaterally.
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AEF 
also A.E.F., abbreviation of American Expeditionary Force, the U.S. military force sent to Europe in 1917 during World War I.
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cave-bear (n.)

Ice Age vegetarian bear of Europe and western Asia (extinct from c. 10.000 years ago), known from fossil remains found in caves, 1826, from cave (n.) + bear (n.).

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Moravia 

region in central Europe, Medieval Latin, named for the River Morva (German March, Latin Marus), which runs through it.

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arnica (n.)
plant genus of the borage family, native to central Europe, 1753, Modern Latin, of unknown origin. Klein suggests Arabic arnabiyah, a name of a type of plant, as the ultimate source.
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Moselle 

river in Western Europe, Latin Mosella, literally "Little Meuse," in reference to the longer River Meuse (Latin Mosa), into which it flows. From 1680s as "wine from the valley of the Moselle."

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Ural 
mountain range between Europe and Asia (the river is named for the mountains), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Vogul urala "mountain peak" or from Tatar ural "boundary."
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