Etymology
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escapade (n.)
1650s, "an escape from confinement," from French escapade (16c.) "a prank or trick," from Spanish escapada "a prank, flight, an escape," noun use of fem. past participle of escapar "to escape," from Vulgar Latin *excappare (see escape (v.)). Or perhaps the French word is via Italian scappata, from scappare, from the same Vulgar Latin source. Figurative sense (1814) implies a "breaking loose" from rules or restraints on behavior.
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get-away (n.)
also getaway, 1852, "an escape," originally in fox hunting, from verbal phrase get away "escape" (early 14c.); see get (v.) + away (adv.). Of prisoners or criminals from 1893.
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evade (v.)

1510s, "escape," from French evader, from Latin evadere "to escape, get away," from assimilated form of ex "away" (see ex-) + vadere "to go, walk" (see vamoose). Special sense of "escape by trickery" is from 1530s. Related: Evaded; evading.

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copout (n.)

"a cowardly escape, an evasion," 1942; see cop out.

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squeak (n.)
1660s, from squeak (v.); sense of "narrow escape" is by 1811.
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get off (v.)
"escape," c. 1600, from get (v.) + off (adv.). Sexual sense attested by 1973.
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reprieve (n.)

1590s, "suspension of the execution of a criminal's sentence," from reprieve (v.). By 1630s in a general sense of "respite or temporary escape."

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Houdini (n.)
"escape artist or other ingenious person," 1923, from Harry Houdini, professional name of U.S. escapist Erich Weiss (1874-1926).
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firetrap (n.)
also fire-trap, "place at great risk of destruction by fire and with insufficient means of escape," 1882, from fire (n.) + trap (n.).
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jail-break (n.)
also jailbreak, "prison escape," 1828, from jail (n.) + break (n.). Verbal phrase to break jail is from 1735.
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