Etymology
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diastase (n.)

enzyme or group of enzymes found in a seed and capable of converting starch into sugar, 1838, from French, coined 1833 by Payen and Persoz, from Greek diastasis "a setting apart," from dia- "across" (see dia-) + stasis "a standing," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Related: Diastatic.

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trypsin (n.)
chief digestive enzyme of pancreatic juice, 1876, coined 1874 by German physiologist Wilhelm Friedrich Kühne (1837-1900), apparently from Greek tripsis "rubbing, friction" (from tribein "to rub, rub down, wear away," from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn") + chemical suffix -in (2). Said to be so called because it first was obtained (in 1862) by rubbing the pancreas with glycerin.
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