Etymology
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dree (v.)

"to suffer, bear, endure," Old English dreogan "to work, suffer, endure" (see drudge (v.)). Phrase dree one's weird "abide one's fate or destiny" is from 14c. Perhaps from a tendency to be confused with draw, the verb faded from use but lingered in North of England and Scottish dialect and was revived as an archaism by Scott and his imitators.

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intolerance (n.)
1765, "unwillingness to endure a differing opinion or belief," from Latin intolerantia "impatience; unendurableness, insufferableness; insolence," from intolerantem "impatient, intolerant" (see intolerant). There is an isolated use from c. 1500, with an apparent sense of "unwillingness." Especially of religious matters through mid-19c. Now-obsolete intolerancy was used in same sense from 1620s; intoleration from 1610s. Meaning "incapacity to bear or endure" is by 1844.
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thole (v.)
"to be subjected to or exposed to, to endure without complaint," now Scottish and Northern English dialect, from Old English þolian "to suffer, endure, undergo; remain, survive; to lose, lack, forfeit," from Proto-Germanic stem *thul- (source also of Old Saxon tholon, Old High German dolon, Old Norse þola, Gothic þulan "to suffer," German geduld "patience"), from PIE *tele- "to bear, carry" (see extol).
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tirade (n.)
"a long, vehement speech, a 'volley of words,' " 1801, from French tirade "a volley, a shot; a pull; a long speech or passage; a drawing out" (16c.), from tirer "draw out, endure, suffer," or the French noun is perhaps from or influenced by cognate Italian tirata "a volley," from past participle of tirare "to draw." The whole Romanic word group is of uncertain origin. Barnhart suggests it is a shortening of the source of Old French martirer "endure martyrdom" (see martyr).
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last (v.)

"endure, go on existing," from Old English læstan "to continue, endure," earlier "follow (a leader), accomplish, carry out, perform," from Proto-Germanic *laistjan "to follow a track" (source also of Gothic laistjan "to follow after," Old Frisian lasta "to fulfill, to pay (duties)," German leisten "to perform, achieve, afford"), from PIE root *lois- "furrow, track." It is related to last (n.1), but not to last (adj.). Related: Lasted; lasting.

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comport (v.)

late 14c., "to bear, endure (grief, pain, etc.; sense now obsolete), from Old French comporter "endure, admit of, allow; behave" (13c.) and directly from Latin comportare "to bring together, collect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over").

Meaning "to agree, accord, be suitable" (with with) is from 1580s. Meaning "to behave, conduct" (with a reflexive pronoun) is from 1610s. Related: Comported; comporting.

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sufferance (n.)
c. 1300, "enduring of hardship, affliction, etc.," also "allowance of wrongdoing," from Old French suffrance, from Late Latin sufferentia, from sufferens, present participle of sufferre "to bear, undergo, endure" (see suffer).
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brook (v.)

"to endure," Old English brucan "to use, enjoy the use of, possess; eat; cohabit with," from Proto-Germanic *brukjanan "to make use of, enjoy" (source also of Old Saxon brukan, Old Frisian bruka "to use, practice," Dutch gebruiken "to use," Old High German bruhhan, German brauchen "to use, need," Gothic brukjan), from PIE root *bhrug- "to enjoy." Sense of "use" as applied to food led to "be able to digest," and by 16c. to "endure, tolerate," always in a negative sense. The original meanings have become obsolete.

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acclimatization (n.)
"modification of a living thing to allow it to endure in a foreign climate," 1830, noun of action from acclimate. There is or was a tendency to use this word in reference to animals and plants and acclimation of humans.
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everlasting 
early 13c., "eternal" (adj.); "eternally" (adv.); "eternity" (n.); from ever + lasting. Colloquially in mid-19c. U.S., "very, exceedingly." A verb, everlast, "to endure forever," is recorded late 14c. Related: Everlastingly.
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