Etymology
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encapsulate (v.)
1842 (implied in encapsulated), "enclose in a capsule," from en- (1) "make, put in" + capsule + -ate (2). Figurative use by 1939. Related: Encapsulating.
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closely (adv.)
1550s, "secretly," from close (adj.) + -ly (2). From 1560s as "compactly," 1590s as "so as to enclose;" 1630s as "nearly."
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contain (v.)

c. 1300, "restrain (someone), control (oneself), behave (in a certain way)," from Old French contein-, tonic stem of contenir, from Latin continere (transitive) "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").

From mid-14c. as "to have (something) as a constituent part;" from late 14c. as "have something inside, enclose." Related: Contained; containing; containable.

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-grad 
Russian, "city," from Old Church Slavonic gradŭ "town, city, citadel," from PIE *ghor-dho-, from root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose," with derivatives referring to enclosure.
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pen (v.2)

"to confine or enclose in a pen," c. 1200, pennen, from Old English *pennian (only in compounds), from the source of pen (n.2). Related: Penned; penning.

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Utgard 
abode of the giants in Norse mythology, from Old Norse Utgarðar, from ut "out" (see out (adv.)) + garðr "yard" (from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose").
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horticulture (n.)
1670s, "cultivation of a garden," coined from Latin hortus "garden" (from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose"), probably on model of agriculture. Famously punned upon by Dorothy Parker.
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embankment (n.)

"a mound, bank, dike, or earthwork raised for any purpose," 1766, from embank "to enclose with a bank" (1570s; see em- (1) + bank (n.2)) + -ment.

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dike (v.)
Origin and meaning of dike

"to make a ditch," Old English dician "make a ditch, surround with a ditch or dike, enclose with a dike or ditches," from the source of dike (n.). Related: Diked; diking.

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Hortense 
fem. proper name, from Latin Hortensia, fem. of Hortensius, a Roman gens name, related to hortus "garden" (from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose").
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