Etymology
Advertisement
capacitor (n.)

"device which stores electricity," 1926, from capacity, in reference to electrical conductors, with Latinate agent-noun ending.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
arc (v.)

1882, in the electrical sense, from arc (n.). Meaning "to move in an arc" is attested by 1940. Related: Arced; arcing.

Related entries & more 
Adrastea 

"nemesis," the distributor of rewards and punishments, a daughter of Zeus, from Greek Adrasteia, literally "she from whom there is no escape," from adrastos "not running away," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + stem of drasmos "a running away," related to dromos "course" (see dromedary).

Related entries & more 
cordless (adj.)

of electrical devices or appliances, "working without a cord, battery-powered," 1905, from cord + -less.

Related entries & more 
joule (n.)

unit of electrical energy, 1882, coined in recognition of British physicist James P. Joule (1818-1889). The surname is a variant of Joel. Related: Joulemeter.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
modem (n.)

by 1937 in reference to electrical transmission of sound and other signals, contracted from modulator-demodulator; see modulator.

Related entries & more 
transistor (n.)

small electronic device, 1948, from transfer + resistor, so called because it transfers an electrical current across a resistor. Said to have been coined by U.S. electrical engineer John Robinson Pierce (1910-2002) of Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, N.J., where the device was invented in 1947. It took over many functions of the vacuum tube. Transistor radio is first recorded 1958.

Related entries & more 
dealer (n.)

Old English dælere "divider, distributor; agent, negotiator," agent noun from deal (v.). Meaning "player who passes out the cards in a game" is from c. 1600; meaning "one whose business is to buy and sell merchandise" is from 1610s. Meaning "purveyor of illegal drugs" is recorded by 1920.

Related entries & more 
watt (n.)

unit of electrical power, 1882, in honor of James Watt (1736-1819), Scottish engineer and inventor. The surname is from an old pet form of Walter and also is in Watson.

Related entries & more 
outage (n.)

"period or condition in which electrical power is disconnected," 1903, American English; formed from out on model of shortage.

Related entries & more 

Page 2