Etymology
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poach (v.2)

"cook in boiling liquid," mid-15c. (implied in pocched egges), from Old French poché, past participle of pochier (12c.), apparently literally "put into a pocket" (perhaps as the white of an egg forms a pocket for the yolk), from poche "bag, pocket," from Frankish *pokka "bag," from Proto-Germanic *puk- (see poke (n.1)). But connection to poke (v.) via the notion of a "broken" (shell-less) egg also has been proposed.

Pochee as a noun in reference to a way of preparing eggs is attested in a late 14c. cookery book, and eyron en poche for "poached eggs" is attested from early 15c. Related: Poaching.

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ovate (adj.)

"egg-shaped," 1760, from Latin ovatus "egg-shaped," from ovum "egg" (see ovary).

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oocyte (n.)

"an egg mother-cell," 1895, from oo- "egg" + -cyte "cell."

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ovum (n.)

"an egg," in a broad biological sense; "the proper product of an ovary," 1706, from Latin ōvum "egg," cognate with Greek ōon, Old Norse egg, Old English æg, from PIE *ōwyo‑, *ōyyo‑ "egg," which is perhaps a derivative of the root *awi- "bird." The proper plural is ova.

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eggshell (n.)

also egg-shell, "the shell or outside covering of an egg, especially the hard, brittle, calcareous covering of birds' eggs," early 15c., from egg (n.) + shell (n.). It displaced ay-schelle (Middle English ei-shel, also a measure of quantity, Old English ægscill), from the native word for "egg." As a color term, from 1894. Emblematic of "thin and delicate" from 1835; the figure of tread on eggshells "move cautiously" is attested by 1734.

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oval (adj.)

"having the longitudinal shape of an egg, elliptical," 1570s, from Modern Latin ovalis "egg-shaped" (source of French oval, 1540s), literally "of or pertaining to an egg," from Latin ovum "egg" (see ovum). The classical Latin word was ovatus (source of ovate (adj.)). Related: Ovalness (1727); ovality (1823).  Oval Office "office of the president of the United States in the White House" has been used since 1942 metonymically for "the presidency."

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Pasch 

"Easter," also "Passover," early 12c., Pasche, Paske; see paschal. Now archaic. Pasch-egg "Easter egg" is from 1570s.

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ovule (n.)

"a little egg," especially one not yet matured and discharged from the ovary of a female mammal, 1821, from French ovule and directly from Modern Latin ōvulum, literally "small egg," diminutive of Latin ōvum "egg" (see ovum).

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oviform (adj.)

"egg-shaped," 1680s, from ōvi-, combining form of Latin ōvus "egg" (see ovum) + forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)).

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oviduct (n.)

"a passage for the egg from the ovary of an animal," 1757, from Modern Latin ōviductus (17c.), from ōvī ductus "channel of an egg." For the elements of this, see ovum and PIE root *deuk- "to lead." Related: Oviducal; oviductal.

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