Etymology
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poach (v.2)

"cook in boiling liquid," mid-15c. (implied in pocched egges), from Old French poché, past participle of pochier (12c.), apparently literally "put into a pocket" (perhaps as the white of an egg forms a pocket for the yolk), from poche "bag, pocket," from Frankish *pokka "bag," from Proto-Germanic *puk- (see poke (n.1)). But connection to poke (v.) via the notion of a "broken" (shell-less) egg also has been proposed.

Pochee as a noun in reference to a way of preparing eggs is attested in a late 14c. cookery book, and eyron en poche for "poached eggs" is attested from early 15c. Related: Poaching.

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ovate (adj.)

"egg-shaped," 1760, from Latin ovatus "egg-shaped," from ovum "egg" (see ovary).

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oo- 

word-forming element meaning "egg, eggs," from Greek ōon "egg," cognate with Latin ovum, Old Norse egg,from PIE *ōwyo‑, *ōyyo‑ "egg," which perhaps is a derivative of the root *awi- "bird."

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oocyte (n.)

"an egg mother-cell," 1895, from oo- "egg" + -cyte "cell."

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ovum (n.)

"an egg," in a broad biological sense; "the proper product of an ovary," 1706, from Latin ōvum "egg," cognate with Greek ōon, Old Norse egg, Old English æg, from PIE *ōwyo‑, *ōyyo‑ "egg," which is perhaps a derivative of the root *awi- "bird." The proper plural is ova.

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ovule (n.)

"a little egg," especially one not yet matured and discharged from the ovary of a female mammal, 1821, from French ovule and directly from Modern Latin ōvulum, literally "small egg," diminutive of Latin ōvum "egg" (see ovum).

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Pasch 

"Easter," also "Passover," early 12c., Pasche, Paske; see paschal. Now archaic. Pasch-egg "Easter egg" is from 1570s.

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oviform (adj.)

"egg-shaped," 1680s, from ōvi-, combining form of Latin ōvus "egg" (see ovum) + forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)).

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eggshell (n.)

also egg-shell, "the shell or outside covering of an egg, especially the hard, brittle, calcareous covering of birds' eggs," early 15c., from egg (n.) + shell (n.). It displaced ay-schelle (Middle English ei-shel, also a measure of quantity, Old English ægscill), from the native word for "egg." As a color term, from 1894. Emblematic of "thin and delicate" from 1835; the figure of tread on eggshells "move cautiously" is attested by 1734.

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glair (n.)
white of an egg (used as a varnish), c. 1300, from Old French glaire "white of egg, slime, mucus" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *claria (ovi) "white part (of an egg)," from Latin clarus "bright, clear" (see clear (adj.)). Related: Glaireous.
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