Etymology
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deflation (n.)

1891, "release of air," noun of action from deflate (q.v.). In reference to currency or economic situations, from 1916. Related: Deflationary.

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globalize (v.)
from 1953 in various senses; the main modern one, with reference to global economic systems, emerged 1959. See global + -ize. Related: Globalized; globalizing.
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hyperinflation (n.)
1925 in the economic sense, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + inflation. Earlier as a medical term in treatment of lung diseases.
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economics (n.)
1580s, "art of managing a household," perhaps from French économique (see economic); also see -ics. Meaning "science of wealth" is from 1792.
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indexation (n.)
1960, in reference to rates of wages, prices, etc. pegged to a specified index of economic activity, noun of action from index (v.).
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tranche (n.)
c. 1500, from French tranche "a cutting," from trancher, trencher "to cut," Old French trenchier "to cut, carve, slice" (see trench). Economic sense is from 1930.
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stagflation (n.)

1965, apparently coined by U.K. politician Iain Macleod (1913-1970), from stag(nation) + (in)flation.

Attacking the Government's economic policy last night in the House of Commons, Mr. Iain Macleod (West Enfield - Con.) the Opposition spokesman on Treasury and economic affairs, described the present situation in Britain as "stagflation" — stagnation and inflation together. [Glasgow Herald, Nov. 18, 1965]
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anti-trust (adj.)

also antitrust, "opposed to the political power or influence of organized business interests," 1890, U.S., from anti- "against" + trust (n.) in the "economic monopoly" sense.

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productivity (n.)
1809, "quality of being productive," from productive + -ity. An earlier word for this was productiveness (1727). Economic sense of "rate of output per unit" is from 1899.
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Marxism (n.)

"the political and economic theories of Karl Marx," 1885, probably immediately from French marxisme; see Marxist + -ism. From 1884 as Karl Marxism. Marxism-Leninism is attested by 1932.

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