Etymology
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esurient (adj.)

"inclined to eat," 1670s, from Latin esurientem (nominative esuriens), present participle of esurire "be hungry, hunger, desire to eat," from stem of edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat"). Related: Esurience; esuriency.

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edible (adj.)

1590s, from Late Latin edibilis "eatable," from Latin edere "to eat," from PIE root *ed- "to eat."

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etch (v.)

1630s, "to engrave by eating away the surface of with acids," from Dutch etsen, from German ätzen "to etch," from Old High German azzon "give to eat; cause to bite, feed," from Proto-Germanic *atjanan, causative of *etanan "eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat"). Related: Etched; etching. The Etch A Sketch drawing toy was introduced 1960 by Ohio Art Company.

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comestible (n.)

1837, "article of food," from French comestible (14c.), from Late Latin comestibilis, from Latin comestus, past participle of comedere "eat up, consume," from com "with, together," here "thoroughly" (see com-) + edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat"). It was attested earlier as an adjective meaning "fit to eat" but this seems to have fallen from use 17c., and the word was reintroduced from French as a noun.

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escarole (n.)

"lettuce-like salad vegetable" (a type of endive), 1897, from French escarole (13c., scariole), from Italian scariola, from Medieval Latin escariola "something edible," ultimately from Latin edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat").

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obesity (n.)

"condition or quality of being corpulent," 1610s, from French obésité and directly from Latin obesitas "fatness, corpulence," from obesus "that has eaten itself fat," past participle of obedere "to eat all over, devour," from ob "about; because of" (see ob-) + edere "eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat").

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edacious (adj.)

"given to eating, voracious," 1736, from Latin edaci-, stem of edax "voracious, gluttonous," from edere "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat") + -ous. Related: Edacity (1620s); edaciously; edaciousness.

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mange (n.)

"skin disease of hairy animals," especially dogs, often caused by mites, c. 1400, manjeue, maniewe, from Old French manjue, mangeue "the itch," also "hunger, appetite; itching, longing," literally "the eating," verbal noun from a collateral form of Old French mangier "to eat" (Modern French manger) "to eat," from Late Latin manducare "to chew, eat," from manducus "glutton," from Latin mandere "to chew" (see mandible).

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manger (n.)

"box or trough in a stable or cow-shed from which horses and cattle eat food other than hay" (which generally is placed in a rack above the manger), early 14c., maunger, from Old French mangeoire "crib, manger," from mangier "to eat" (Modern French manger) "to eat," from Late Latin manducare "to chew, eat," from manducus "glutton," from Latin mandere "to chew" (see mandible). With Old French -oire, common suffix for implements and receptacles. In Middle English, to have at rack and manger was an image for "keep (a mistress, followers, etc.), supply with life's necessities."

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breakfast (v.)

1670s, "to eat breakfast;" 1793 as "to supply with breakfast," from breakfast (n.). Related: Breakfasted; breakfasting.

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