Etymology
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immanent (adj.)

"indwelling, remaining within, inherent," 1530s, via French immanent (14c.) or directly from Late Latin immanens, present participle of immanere "to dwell in, remain in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin manere "to dwell" (from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain"). In medieval philosophy contrasted with transitive; later with transcendent. Related: Immanently.

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bound (adj.2)
c. 1200, boun, "ready to go;" hence "going or intending to go" (c. 1400), from Old Norse buinn past participle of bua "to prepare," also "to dwell, to live," from Proto-Germanic *bowan (source also of Old High German buan "to dwell," Old Danish both "dwelling, stall"), from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow." Final -d is presumably through association with bound (adj.1).
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bylaw (n.)
also by-law, late 13c., bilage "local ordinance," from Old Norse or Old Danish bi-lagu "town law," from byr "place where people dwell, town, village," from bua "to dwell" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow") + lagu "law" (see law). So, a local law pertaining to local residents, hence "a standing rule of a corporation or association for regulation of its organization and conduct." Sense influenced by by.
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sojourn (v.)
late 13c., "stay temporarily, reside for a time; visit;" also "reside permanently, dwell;" from Old French sojorner "stay or dwell for a time," from Vulgar Latin *subdiurnare "to spend the day" (source also of Italian soggiornare), from Latin sub- "under, until" (see sub-) + diurnare "to last long," from diurnus "of a day," from diurnum "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). Modern French séjourner formed via vowel dissimilation. Related: Sojourned; sojourning.
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seclusive (adj.)

"disposed to shut out, inclined to dwell apart," 1743, from seclus-, past-participle stem of Latin secludere "to shut off, confine" (see seclude) + -ive. Related: Seclusively; seclusiveness.

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sojourn (n.)
mid-13c., "temporary stay, visit," from Anglo-French sojorn, variant of Old French sejorn, from sejorner "stay or dwell for a time" (see sojourn (v.)).
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cohabitation (n.)

mid-15c., cohabitacioun, "action or state of living together," from Old French cohabitacion "cohabitation; sexual intercourse," or directly from Late Latin cohabitationem (nominative cohabitatio), noun of action from past participle stem of cohabitare "to dwell together," from co- "with, together" (see co-) + habitare "to live, inhabit, dwell," frequentative of habere "to have, to hold, possess" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Specifically "state of living together as husband and wife without benefit of marriage," implying sexual intercourse, from 1540s.

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Amphictyonic (adj.)
in reference to one of several ancient Greek confederations of neighboring states, 1753, probably via French, from Greek amphiktionikos, from amphiktiones "neighbors," literally "they that dwell round about," from amphi "on both sides, all around" (from PIE root *ambhi- "around") + second element related to ktizein "to create, found," ktoina "habitation, township," from PIE *kti-, metathesized form of root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home."

The most famous was that of Delphi. Madison and other U.S. Founders devoted close study to it. Shaftesbury has amphictyonian (1711).
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bucolic (adj.)
"pastoral, relating to country life or the affairs and occupations of a shepherd," 1610s, earlier bucolical (1520s), from Latin bucolicus, from Greek boukolikos "pastoral, rustic," from boukolos "cowherd, herdsman," from bous "cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + -kolos "tending," related to Latin colere "to till (the ground), cultivate, dwell, inhabit" (from PIE root *kwel- (1) "revolve, move round; sojourn, dwell"). Middle Irish búachaill, Welsh bugail "shepherd" are Celtic words formed from the same root material as Greek boukolos.
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telos (n.)
"ultimate object or aim," 1904, from Greek telos "the end, limit, goal, fulfillment, completion," from PIE *kwel-es-, suffixed form of root *kwel- (1) "revolve, move round; sojourn, dwell," perhaps via the notion of "turning point (of a race-course, a field)."
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