Etymology
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guess-work (n.)
also guesswork, "what is done by or due to guess," 1725, from guess (v.) + work (n.).
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senility (n.)

"old age, especially the weakness or imbecility due to old age," 1753, from senile + -ity.

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deliberately (adv.)

late 15c., "with due consideration, with a set purpose," from deliberate (adj.) + -ly (2).

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allowed (adj.)
late 14c., "praised;" mid-15c., "assigned as a due share;" late 15c., "permitted," past-participle adjective from allow.
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comptroller (n.)

c. 1500, a variant of controller, with bad spelling due to influence of unrelated French compte "an account," from Latin computare.

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hastily (adv.)
c. 1300, "quickly," from hasty + -ly (2). Meaning "rashly, without due consideration" is 1580s. Old English hæstlice meant "violently."
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unduly (adv.)
late 14c., "without due moderation; improperly, unsuitably;" see undue + -ly (2). From early 15c. as "unjustly, wrongfully."
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impedance (n.)
"hindrance," especially and originally "resistance due to induction in an electrical circuit," 1886, from impede + -ance. The classically correct formation would be *impedience.
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acknowledgement (n.)
1590s, "act of acknowledging," from acknowledge + -ment. "An early instance of -ment added to an orig. Eng. vb." [OED]. Meaning "token of due recognition" is recorded from 1610s.
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register (n.2)
"assistant court officer in administrative or routine function," 1530s, now chiefly U.S., alteration of registrar (q.v) due to influence of register.
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