Etymology
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driveway (n.)

1870, "a way for driving," from drive (v.) + way (n.). Drive alone in this sense is attested from 1816. Specifically as "private road from a public road to a private house" by 1884. 

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drove (n.)

"a herd, especially of cattle," Old English draf "beasts driven in a body; road along which cattle are driven," originally "act of driving," from drifan "to drive" (see drive (v.)).

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hyperdrive (n.)
by 1951, an invented word used by science fiction writers to describe anything that can power a space craft faster than the speed of light, contra Einstein. From drive (n.) with the first element perhaps abstracted from hyperspace.
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driver (n.)

"one who or that which drives" in various senses, late 14c. (late 13c. as a surname); agent noun from drive (v.). Earliest sense is "herdsman, drover, one who drives livestock." From mid-15c. as "one who drives a vehicle." In U.S., "overseer of a gang of slaves," by 1796. Meaning "golf club for hitting great distances" is by 1892. Driver's seat is attested by 1867; figurative use by 1954.

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drift (n.)

early 14c., literally "a being driven" (at first of snow, rain, etc.); not recorded in Old English, it is either a suffixed form of drive (v.) (compare thrift/thrive) or borrowed from Old Norse drift "snow drift," or Middle Dutch drift "pasturage, drove, flock," both from Proto-Germanic *driftiz (source also of Danish and Swedish drift, German Trift), from PIE root *dhreibh- "to drive, push" (see drive (v.)).

"A being driven," hence "anything driven," especially a number of things or a heap of matter driven or moving together (mid-15c.). Figurative sense of "aim, intention, what one is getting at" (on the notion of "course, tendency") is from 1520s. Nautical sense of "deviation of a ship from its course in consequence of currents" is from 1670s. Meaning "controlled slide of a sports car" attested by 1955.

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propel (v.)

mid-15c., propellen, "to drive away, expel," from Latin propellere "push forward, drive forward, drive forth; move, impel," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + pellere "to push, drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Meaning "to drive onward, cause to move forward" is from 1650s. Related: Propelled; propelling.

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compel (v.)

"to drive or urge irresistibly by physical or moral force," mid-14c., from Old French compellir and directly from Latin compellere "to drive together, drive to one place" (of cattle), "to force or compel" (of persons), from com "with, together" (see com-) + pellere "to drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Related: Compelled; compelling.

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expel (v.)
late 14c., "cast out," from Latin expellere "drive out, drive away," from ex "out" (see ex-) + pellere "to drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Specific meaning "to eject from a school" is first recorded 1640s. Related: Expelled; expelling.
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dispel (v.)
Origin and meaning of dispel

c. 1400, dispellen, "drive off or away," from Latin dispellere "drive apart," from dis- "away" (see dis-) + pellere "to drive, push" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Since the meaning is "to drive away in different directions" it should not have as an object a single, indivisible thing (you can dispel suspicion, but not an accusation). Related: Dispelled; dispelling.

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transact (v.)
1580s, back-formation from transaction, or else from Latin transactus, past participle of transigere "to drive through, accomplish, bring to an end, settle," from trans "across, beyond; through" (see trans-) + agere "to set in motion, drive, drive forward," hence "to do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Related: Transacted; transacting.
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