Etymology
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canid (n.)
"a carnivorous mammal of the Canidae family" (dogs, wolves, foxes, jackals), 1879, from Modern Latin Canidae, from Latin canis "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + -idae.
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bitchy (adj.)

1925, U.S. slang, "sexually provocative;" later (1930s) "spiteful, catty, bad-tempered" (usually of females); from bitch + -y (2). Earlier in reference to male dogs thought to look less rough or coarse than usual.

Mr. Ramsay says we would now call the old dogs "bitchy" in face. That is because the Englishmen have gone in for the wrong sort of forefaces in their dogs, beginning with the days when Meersbrook Bristles and his type swept the judges off their feet and whiskers and an exaggerated face were called for in other varieties of terriers besides the wire haired fox. [James Watson, "The Dog Book," New York, 1906]

Related: Bitchily; bitchiness.

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canine (adj.)
c. 1600, "pertaining to one of the four sharp-pointed tearing teeth between the incisors and the molars," from canine (n.) or Latin caninus. Meaning "pertaining to a dog or dogs" is from 1620s.
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mush (interj.)

command to sled dogs, 1897, first recorded 1862, as mouche, perhaps altered from French marchons! "advance!" (imperative of marcher "to march;" see march (v.)). Related: Musher.

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bear-baiting (n.)

"sport of setting dogs (usually mastiffs) to fight with captive bears," late 15c., from bear (n.) + baiting. It was prohibited in Great Britain in 1835.

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hard-bitten (adj.)
"tough, tough in a fight," literally "given to hard biting," 1715, originally of hunting dogs, from hard (adv.) + bitten, with the past participle used actively (as in free-spoken).
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tucker (v.)
"to tire, weary," 1833, New England slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps from tucked (past participle of tuck (v.)), which had, in reference to dogs, a slang sense of "exhausted, underfed." Especially with out. Related: Tuckered; tuckering.
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rain (v.)

"fall in drops through the air," Middle English reinen, from Old English regnian, usually contracted to rinan; see rain (n.), and compare Old Norse rigna, Swedish regna, Danish regne, Old High German reganon, German regnen, Gothic rignjan. Related: Rained; raining. Transferred and figurative use, of other things that fall in showers or drops (blessings, tears, etc.), is by c. 1200.

To rain on (someone's) parade is attested from 1941. Phrase to rain cats and dogs is attested from 1738 (variation rain dogs and polecats is from 1650s), of unknown origin and signification, despite intense speculation. One of the less likely suggestions is pets sliding off sod roofs when the sod got too wet during a rainstorm. (Ever see a dog react to a rainstorm by climbing up an exposed roof?) Probably rather an extension of cats and dogs as proverbial for "strife, enmity" (1570s).

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dog-ear (v.)

also dogs-ear, "to use a book so as to leave the corners of the leaves soiled and curled over" (like the ears of a dog), 1650s. Dog's ear (n.) is by 1725. Dog-eared in the general or extended sense of "worn, unkempt" is by 1894.

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Pavlovian (adj.)

1931, from the theories, experiments, and methods of Russian physiologist Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), especially in connection with the conditioned salivary reflexes of dogs in response to the mental stimulus of the sound of a bell (attested from 1911, in Pavloff [sic] method).

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