Etymology
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partition (n.)

c. 1400, particioun, "division into shares, distinction," from Old French particion (12c.), from Latin partitionem (nominative partitio) "a sharing, division, partition, distribution; method of dividing," from past participle stem of partire "to part, divide," from pars "a part, piece, a share" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot"). Sense of "that which separates" is recorded from late 15c. Meaning "act of parting or dividing, state of being divided" is from c. 1500.

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squadron (n.)

1560s, from Italian squadrone, augmentative of squadra "battalion," literally "square" (see squad). As a division of a fleet, from 1580s, of an air force, 1912.

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departmental (adj.)

1791, "pertaining to a (French) department, pertaining to a division of a country," from French départmental, from département (see department). Meaning "of departmental systems generally" from 1832. Related: Departmentally.

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sept (n.)

"enclosed area," 1540s, from Latin septum (see septum). As "division of a nation or tribe," 1510s, it is apparently a different word, "prob. a var. of sect" [OED].

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Clootie (n.)

also Clutie, "the devil," 1785, Scottish, literally "hoofed," from cloot "hoof, division of a hoof" (1725), which is of uncertain origin, perhaps from a dialectal survival of Old Norse klo "claw" (see claw (n.)).

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ex parte 

Latin legal term, "on the one side only," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + parte, ablative of pars "a part, piece, a division, a fraction, a side of the body" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

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stagecoach (n.)

also stage-coach, 1650s, from stage (n.) in a sense of "division of a journey without stopping for rest" (c. 1600) + coach (n.).

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prophase 

first stage in a nuclear division, 1884, from German prophase (Strasburger, 1884); see pro- + phase (n.). Greek prophasis meant "that which appears, a motive or pretext."

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Vietnam 

country in Southeast Asia, from Vietnamese Viet, the people's name + nam "south." Division into North and South lasted from 1954 to 1976. Vietnam War attested by 1963.

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wapentake (n.)

division of certain English counties (equivalent to a hundred in other places), Old English wæpengetæc "division of a riding," from Old Norse vapnatak, from vapna, genitive plural of vapn "weapon" (see weapon) + tak "a touching, a taking hold, a grasping," from taka "to take, grasp," from Proto-Germanic *tak- (see take (v.)). Perhaps it originally was an armed muster with inspection of weapons, or else an assembly where consent was expressed by brandishing swords and spears.

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