Etymology
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fusil (n.)
flintlock musket, 1670s, from French fusil "musket" (see fusilier). Originally in English as distinguished from the matchlock variety.
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membral (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the limbs of an animal," as distinguished from its body proper, c. 1600; see member + -al (1).

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melodic (adj.)

1818, "melodious;" by 1823, "pertaining to the melody" (as distinguished from the harmony), from French mélodique, from Late Latin melodicus, from Greek melodikos, from melodia (see melody). Related: Melodical "melodious" (1590s).

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laic (adj.)
1560s, "belonging to the people" (as distinguished from the clergy and the professionals), from French laïque (16c.), from Late Latin laicus, from Greek laikos "of or belonging to the people," from laos "people" (see lay (adj.)).
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noted (adj.)

c. 1300, "observed," past-participle adjective from note (v.). Meaning "observed for some special quality, conspicuous, distinguished" is from mid-15c. Related: Notedness.

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produce (n.)
"thing or things produced," 1690s, from produce (v.), and originally accented like it. Specific sense of "agricultural productions" (as distinguished from manufactured goods) is from 1745.
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brute (n.)
1610s, "a beast" (as distinguished from a man), especially one of the higher quadrupeds, from brute (adj.). From 1660s as "a brutal person, a savage in disposition or manners."
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egregious (adj.)

1530s, "distinguished, eminent, excellent," from Latin egregius "distinguished, excellent, extraordinary," from the phrase ex grege "rising above the flock," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + grege, ablative of grex "a herd, flock" (from PIE root *ger- "to gather").

Disapproving sense, now predominant, arose late 16c., originally ironic. It is not in the Latin word, which etymologically means simply "exceptional." Related: Egregiously; egregiousness.

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alehouse (n.)
also ale-house, Old English ealahus; see ale + house (n.). In the same sense Old English also had ealusele. An alehouse "is distinguished from a tavern, where they sell wine" [Johnson].
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brilliance (n.)
"quality of being brilliant," 1755, from brilliant + -ance. Figurative sense (of wit, intelligence, etc.) is from 1779. Distinguished from brilliancy in that the latter usually is applied to things measurable in degrees.
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