Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for dissolvent. Showing results for dissolve.
dilution (n.)

"act of making thin, weak, or more liquid," 1640s, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin diluere "dissolve, wash away, dilute," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + -luere, combining form of lavere "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tabes (n.)
"emaciation," 1650s, medical Latin, from Latin tabes "a melting, wasting away, putrefaction," from tabere "to melt, waste away, be consumed," from PIE *ta- "to melt, dissolve" (see thaw (v.)).
Related entries & more 
deliquesce (v.)

1756, in chemistry, "melt or dissolve gradually, become liquid by absorbing moisture from the air," from Latin deliquescere "to melt away," from de- (see de-) + liquescere "to melt," from liquere "to be liquid" (see liquid (adj.)). Transferred or figurative meaning "to melt away" is by 1858.

Related entries & more 
lysergic (adj.)
in reference to a crystalline organic compound, 1934, from the -lys- in hydrolysis (thus from Greek lysis "a loosening, a dissolution," from lyein "to loosen, dissolve;" from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart") + the first syllable of ergot (a fungus from which the chemical was first obtained) + -ic.
Related entries & more 
divorce (v.)

c. 1400, divorcen, "to put away or abandon (a spouse); to dissolve the marriage contract between by process of law," from Old French divorcer, from divorce (see divorce (n.)). Extended sense of "release or sever from any close connection" is from early 15c. Related: Divorced; divorcing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
absolution (n.)
Origin and meaning of absolution

"remission, forgiveness," c. 1200, from Old French absolucion, earlier assolucion, from Latin absolutionem (nominative absolutio) "completion, acquittal," noun of action from past-participle stem of absolvere "set free, loosen, acquit," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + solvere "to loosen, dissolve; untie, release; dismiss," from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart." Originally of sins; in general use from c. 1400.

Related entries & more 
breakup (n.)
also break-up, "a disruption, dissolution of connection, separation of a mass into parts," 1795, from verbal expression break up "separate, dissolve" (mid-15c.); see break (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase was used of plowland, later of groups, assemblies, etc.; of things (also of marriages, relationships), from mid-18c. Break it up as a command to stop a fight, etc., is recorded from 1936.
Related entries & more 
deliquescent (adj.)

1791, in chemistry, "liquefying in air," from Latin deliquescentem (nominative deliquescens), present participle of deliquescere "to melt away," from de- (see de-) + liquescere "to melt," from liquere "to be liquid" (see liquid (adj.)). Transferred or figurative sense of "apt to dissolve or melt away" is by 1837. Related: Deliquescence.

Related entries & more 
solve (v.)
late 14c., "to disperse, dissipate, loosen," from Latin solvere "to loosen, dissolve; untie, release, detach; depart; unlock; scatter; dismiss; accomplish, fulfill; explain; remove," from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart." The meaning "explain, answer" is attested from 1530s; for sense evolution, see solution. Mathematical use is attested from 1737. Related: Solved; solving.
Related entries & more 
soluble (adj.)
late 14c., "capable of being dissolved," from Old French soluble "expungable, eradicable" (13c.), from Late Latin solubilis "that may be loosened or dissolved," from stem of Latin solvere "to loosen, dissolve," from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart." Meaning "capable of being solved" is attested from 1705. Substances are soluble, not solvable; problems can be either.
Related entries & more 

Page 2