Etymology
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shop-worn (adj.)
"shabby from handling while on display," 1838, from shop (n.) + worn (adj.).
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ostentatious (adj.)

1701, "characterized by display or show from vanity or pride;" 1713, "showy, gaudy, intended for vain display," from ostentation + -ous. Earlier in a similar sense were ostentative (c. 1600); ostentive (1590s); ostentous (1620s). Related: Ostentatiously; ostentatiousness (1650s).

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mounted (adj.)

1590s, "on horseback," past-participle adjective from mount (v.). From 1690s as "set up for display."

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airing (n.)
"action of exposing to air," c. 1600, verbal noun from air (v.). Meaning "display, public exposure" is from 1870.
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promenade (v.)

"to make a promenade; walk about for amusement, display, or exercise," 1580s, from promenade (n.). Related: Promenaded; promenading.

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snarl (n.2)
"a sharp growl accompanied by a display of the teeth," 1610s, from snarl (v.2).
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pixel (n.)

"small, square single-colored display elements that comprise an image," 1969, coined to describe the photographic elements of a television image, from pix + first syllable of element.

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feature (v.)
1755, "to resemble, have features resembling," from feature (n.). The sense of "make special display or attraction of" is 1888; entertainment sense from 1897. Related: Featured; featuring.
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exhibition (n.)

early 14c., "action of displaying," from Old French exhibicion, exibicion "show, exhibition, display," from Late Latin exhibitionem (nominative exhibitio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin exhibere "to show, display, present," literally "hold out, hold forth," from ex "out" (see ex-) + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Also from early 15c. as "sustenance, food, source of support." Meaning "that which is exhibited" is from 1786.

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-rama 
noun suffix meaning "sight, view, spectacular display or instance of," 1824, abstracted from panorama (q.v.), ultimately from Greek horama "sight, spectacle, that which is seen."
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