Etymology
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sone (n.)

unit of loudness, 1936, from Latin sonus "sound," from PIE root *swen- "to sound."

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picosecond (n.)

unit of time equal to one trillionth of a second, 1966, from pico- + second (n.).

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permeate (v.)

"to pass into or through without rupture or displacement," 1650s, from Latin permeatus, past participle of permeare "to pass through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + meare "to pass," from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move." Related: Permeated; permeating.

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lira (n.)
Italian monetary unit, 1610s, from Italian lira, literally "pound," from Latin libra "pound (unit of weight);" see Libra, and compare livre. There also was a Turkish lira.
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megavolt (n.)

unit of measure equivalent to one million volts, 1868, from mega- "one million" + volt.

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cpu 

also c.p.u., by 1970, abbreviation of central processing unit.

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ohm (n.)
unit of electrical resistance, 1867, in recognition of German physicist Georg S. Ohm (1789-1854), who determined the law of the flow of electricity. Originally proposed as ohma (1861) as a unit of voltage. Related: ohmage; ohmic; ohmeter.
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sku (n.)
by 1974, acronym from stock-keeping unit.
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lev (n.)
monetary unit of Bulgaria, introduced 1881, literally "lion" (compare leu).
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millibar (n.)

unit of barometric pressure, by 1910, from milli- + bar (n.4).

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