Etymology
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filthy (adj.)

late 12c., fulthe, "corrupt, sinful," from filth + -y (2). Meaning "physically unclean, dirty, noisome" is from late 14c. Meaning "morally dirty, obscene" is from 1530s.

In early use often hardly more emphatic than the mod. dirty; it is now a violent expression of disgust, seldom employed in polite colloquial speech. [OED]

Related: Filthily; filthiness.

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joculator (n.)

"professional jester; a minstrel," c. 1500, from Latin ioculator "a joker, jester," from iocus "pastime; a joke" (see joke (n.)).

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jocose (adj.)

"given to jokes and jesting," 1670s, from Latin iocosus "full of jesting, fond of jokes, funny," from iocus "pastime, sport; a jest, joke" (see joke (n.)). Often it implies ponderous humor (compare jocund). Related: Jocosely; jocoseness.

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stink eye (n.)

"dirty look," by 1972, perhaps from Hawaiian slang.

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slutty (adj.)

c. 1400, "dirty, slovenly, unwashed," from slut + -ish. The sense of "lascivious, suggestive" is modern. Middle English also had an adverb slutly (late 15c., slutli) "in a dirty or slovenly way."

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jokester (n.)

1819, from joke + -ster. Jokesmith is from 1813.

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grubby (adj.)

"dirty," by 1845, from grub (n.) in a sense of "dirty child" (who presumably got that way from digging in earth) + -y (2). Earlier it was used in a sense of "stunted, dwarfish" (1610s) and "infested with grubs" (1725). Related: Grubbily; grubbiness.

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fun (v.)

1680s, "to cheat;" 1833 "to make fun, jest, joke," from fun (n.). Related: Funning.

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one-liner (n.)

"short joke, witty remark," by 1951, from one + line.

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saliva (n.)

"spittle, the secretions of the salivary glands of the mouth," early 15c. (Chauliac), salive, from Old French salive and directly from Latin saliva "spittle" (from Proto-Italic *sal-iwo- "dirty yellow," from PIE root *sal- (2) "dirty; gray; "see sallow (adj.)). Related: Salival.

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