Etymology
Advertisement
gullet (n.)

"passage from the mouth of an animal to the stomach," c. 1300 (as a surname), from Old French golet "neck (of a bottle); gutter; bay, creek," diminutive of gole "throat, neck" (Modern French gueule), from Latin gula "throat," also "appetite," which is related to gluttire "to gulp down, devour," glutto "a glutton." De Vaan writes, "We seem to be dealing with an onomatopoeic formation of the form *gul- / *glu-." Compare Old English ceole "throat;" Old Church Slavonic glutu "gullet," Russian glot "draught, gulp;" Old Irish gelim "I devour."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
omnivorous (adj.)

"eating food of every kind indiscriminately," 1650s, from Latin omnivorus "all-devouring," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + vorare "devour, swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Figurative use by 1791. Related: Omnivorously; omnivorousness.

Related entries & more 
ravening (adj.)

"voracious, savage," late 14c., present-participle adjective from an extinct verb ravine, raven "to prey, to plunder, devour greedily" (mid-14c.), from Old French raviner, ravinier "to seize, pillage" (see raven (v.)). It is etymologically related to ravenous, but not to raven (n.). Related: Raveningly.

Related entries & more 
herbivore (n.)
"plant-eating animal," 1851, from Modern Latin Herbivora (1830) or French herbivore (1748), from neuter plural of Latin herbivorus, from herba "a plant" (see herb) + vorare "devour, swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").
Related entries & more 
locavore (n.)
one who eats only locally grown or raised food, by 2001, from local (adj.) + ending abstracted from carnivore, etc., ultimately from Latin vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
glom (v.)
1907, glahm "grab, snatch, steal," American English underworld slang, from Scottish glaum (1715), apparently from Gaelic glam "to handle awkwardly, grab voraciously, devour." Sense of "look at, watch" (1945) apparently is derived from the same source. Related: Glommed; glomming.
Related entries & more 
gangrene (n.)

"putrefaction or necrosis of soft tissues," 1540s, cancrena, from Latin gangraena (Medieval Latin cancrena), from medical Greek gangraina "an eating or gnawing sore," literally "that which eats away," a dissimilated, reduplicated form of gran- "to gnaw," from PIE root *gras- "to devour" (see gastric).

Related entries & more 
engorge (v.)
1510s, "fill to excess," from French engorger "to obstruct, block, congest," Old French engorgier "to swallow, devour," from en- (see en- (1)) + gorge "throat" (see gorge (n.)). Probably originally in reference to hawks. Related: Engorged; engorging.
Related entries & more 
obesity (n.)

"condition or quality of being corpulent," 1610s, from French obésité and directly from Latin obesitas "fatness, corpulence," from obesus "that has eaten itself fat," past participle of obedere "to eat all over, devour," from ob "about; because of" (see ob-) + edere "eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat").

Related entries & more 
carnivorous (adj.)
"eating or feeding on flesh," 1640s, from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating, feeding on flesh," from caro (genitive carnis) "flesh" (originally "a piece of flesh," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut") + vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Related: Carnivorously; carnivorousness; carnivoracity.
Related entries & more 

Page 2