Etymology
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futures (n.)
"goods sold on agreement for future delivery," 1880, from future (n.) in a financial sense "speculative purchase or sale of stock or other commodities for future delivery."
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teamster (n.)
"person who drives a team of horses" (especially in hauling freight), 1776, from team (n.) + -ster. Transferred to motor truck drivers by 1907.
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craniotomy (n.)

a cutting open of the skull (especially of a fetal head when it obstructs delivery), 1817, from cranio- "of the skull" + -tomy "a cutting."

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forklift (n.)
also fork-lift, by 1953, short for fork-lift truck (1946), from fork (n.) + lift (n.).
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RFD 
also R.F.D.; 1882, American English, it stands for rural free delivery.
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van (n.2)
"covered truck or wagon," 1829, shortening of caravan. Century Dictionary suggests this was perhaps regarded as *carry-van.
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jack-knife (v.)
1776, "to stab," from jack-knife (n.). Intransitive meaning "to fold or bend" the body is said to date from the time of the American Civil War. The truck accident verbal sense is from 1949. Related: Jackknifed; jackknifing.
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accouchement (n.)
"parturition, delivery in childbed," 1803, from French accouchement, noun of action from accoucher "go to childbed" (see accoucheur). The verb accouche (1867) is a back-formation, or else from French accoucher.
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pickup (n.)

also pick-up, "that which is picked up," 1848; see pick up (v.). As "act of picking up" from 1882. Meaning "capacity for acceleration" is from 1909; that of "recovery" is from 1916. In reference to a game between informal teams chosen on the spot, from 1905; as an adjective, "composed of such things as are immediately available," by 1859.

Meaning "small truck used for light loads," 1937, is shortened from pickup truck (pickup body is attested from 1928). The notion probably being of a vehicle for use to "pick up" (feed, lumber, etc.) and deliver it where it was wanted.

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miscarriage (n.)

1580s, "mistake, error, a going wrong;" 1610s, "misbehavior, wrong or perverse course of conduct;" see miscarry + -age. In pathology, the meaning "untimely delivery" is from 1660s, on the notion of "fail to reach the intended result." Miscarriage of justice is from 1875, from the "going wrong" sense.

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