Etymology
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minimally (adv.)

"to a minimal extent or degree," 1894, from minimal + -ly (2).

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minimum (adj.)

"of the smallest possible amount or degree, that is the lowest obtainable," 1810, from minimum (n.).

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gravely (adv.)
1550s, "solemnly," from grave (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "in an important degree" is by 1835.
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moderately (adv.)

"in a moderate manner or degree," late 14c., from moderate (adj.) + -ly (2).

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least (adj.)
Old English læst, earlier læsest "smallest, lowest in power or position" (superlative of little (adj.)), from Proto-Germanic superlative *laisista-, from PIE root *leis- (2) "small" (see less). Qualifying phrase at least "not to say more than is certainly true" is Middle English æt læstan, from the notion of "at the lowest degree." As a noun, "smallest admissible quantity or degree," from early 12c.; as an adverb, Old English læst "in the least degree."
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reflectivity (n.)

"reflectiveness, degree to which a thing or surface reflects or is reflected," 1849, from reflective + -ity.

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passing (adv.)

"in a (sur)passing degree, surpassingly," late 14c.; from passing (adj); see pass (v.).

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partly (adv.)

"in part, in some measure or degree, not wholly," 1520s, from part (n.) + -ly (2).

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empath (n.)

"person with a high degree of empathic ability," by 1980, from empathic, etc. (compare psychopath/psychopathic).

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extremely (adv.)
1530s, from extreme + -ly (2). Originally "with great severity," later more loosely, "in extreme degree" (1570s).
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