Etymology
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numerical (adj.)

"pertaining to or relating to number, denoting number," 1620s, from Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)) + -ical. Perhaps by influence of French numérique "of a number or numbers." Related: Numerically.

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outnumber (v.)

"to number more than, exceed in number," 1660s, from out- + number (v.). Related: Outnumbered; outnumbering.

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numerate (v.)

"to count, enumerate," 1721, from Latin numeratus, past participle of numerare "to count, to number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). Related: Numerated; numerating.

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numerosity (n.)

"state of being numerous," 1610s, from Latin numerositatem (nominative numerositas) "a great number, a multitude," from numerosus "numerous," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)).

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numerative (adj.)

1788, "pertaining to numbering or numeration," from Latin numerat-, past-participle stem of numerare "to count, number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)) + -ive. Related: Numeratively.

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pence (n.)

late 14c., a contraction of penies, collective plural of penny. Spelling with -ce reflects the voiceless pronunciation (compare dice (n.), deuce, hence). After the introduction of decimal currency in Britain in 1971, it began to be used in singular (one pence).

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numerous (adj.)

early 15c., "consisting of a large number," from Latin numerosus "numerous," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). Related: Numerously; numerousness.

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numerator (n.)

1540s, "word or figure by which the number of something is denoted" (a sense now obsolete), from Late Latin numerator "counter, numberer," agent noun from numerat-, past-participle stem of numerare "to count, number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). From 1570s as "the number written above the line in a fraction," by 1670s as "one who or that which numbers."

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DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

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numeral (n.)

1520s, "word expressing a number," from French numéral (15c.), from Late Latin numeralis "of or belonging to a number," from Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). Meaning "figure or character standing for a number" is from 1680s. As an adjective, "expressing number," from late 14c.

Old English numerals past 20 (e.g. seofan and twentig) were formed as in modern German; the modern English pattern likely is from influence of French (vingt-sept).

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