Etymology
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horse-flesh (n.)
also horseflesh, c. 1400, "horses collectively;" 1530s, "meat from a horse," from horse (n.) + flesh (n.). From 1520s as a color-name.
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cart-horse (n.)
"horse that draws a cart," late 14c., from cart (n.) + horse (n.).
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race-horse (n.)

"horse bred or kept for running in contests," 1620s, from race (n.1) + horse (n.).

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horse-faced (adj.)
"having a long, rough, ugly face," 1670s, from horse (n.) + face (n.).
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coach-horse (n.)

"horse used or suitable for driving a coach," c. 1600, from coach (n.) + horse (n.).

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charley horse (n.)
1887, sporting slang, origin obscure, probably from somebody's long-forgotten lame racehorse. Charley horse seems to have been a name for a horse or a type of horse (perhaps especially a lame one) around that time.
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clothes-horse (n.)

also clothes horse, "upright wooden frame for hanging clothes to dry," 1788, from clothes + horse (n.) in its secondary sense "that upon which something is mounted." Figurative sense of "person whose sole function seems to be to show off clothes" is 1850. Clothes-screen, which had the same literal sense, is attested in the figurative sense from 1830.

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horse-race (n.)
also horserace, 1580s, from horse (n.) + race (n.1). Related: Horse-racing.
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