Etymology
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misdate (v.)

"give a false or wrong date to, date erroneously," 1580s, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + date (v.1). Related: Misdated; misdating. As a noun by 1832.

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update (v.)
1944, in reference to information, 1952 in reference to persons, from up (adv.) + date (v.1). Related: Updated; updating. The noun is attested from 1967.
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outdated (adj.)

also out-dated, "grown obsolete," 1590s, from out- + past participle of date (v.1). Out-of-date is attested from 1610s. The verb, out-date "make obsolete" is by 1640s, perhaps 1590s.

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undated (adj.)
"left without indication of date," 1560s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of date (v.1) "assign a date to." Compare similarly formed German undatirt, Dutch ongedateerd, Swedish odaterad.
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postdate (v.)

also post-date, "to affix a later date to than the real one," 1620s, from post- + date (v.1) "to assign a date to, to mark a date on." Related: Postdated; postdating. Intransitive meaning "be of a later date than" is by 1909.

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backdate (v.)
also back-date, "assign a date to earlier than the actual one," by 1881 (implied in back-dated), from back (adv.) + date (v.1). Compare antedate. Related: Backdated; backdating.
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up-to-date (adv.)
1840, "right to the present time," from phrase up to date, probably originally from bookkeeping. As an adjective from 1865. Meaning "having the latest facts" is recorded from 1889; that of "having current styles and tastes" is from 1891.
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antedate (v.)
1580s, "to date before the true time," earlier as noun meaning "a backdating, false early date attached to a document or event" (1570s); from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + date (v.1). Meaning "be of older date than" is from 1660s. Related: Antedated; antedating.
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dateline (n.)

also date-line, 1880 as an imaginary line down the Pacific Ocean on which the calendar day begins and ends, from date (n.1) + line (n.). Never set by any treaty or international organization, it is an informal construct meant to coincide with a line 180 degrees (12 hours) from Greenwich, but it always has followed a more or less crooked course.

Meaning "line of text that tells the date and place of origin of a newspaper, article, telegram, etc." is by 1888.

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conker (n.)

"snail shell" (said to date from 1847), also "horse chestnut" (said to date from 1886), both said to be from children's game of conkers (q.v.).

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