Etymology
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readout (n.)

also read-out, 1946 in the computer sense, "extraction or transfer of data from a storage device," from the verbal phrase; see read (v.) + out (adv.).

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massage (v.)

"apply massage to, treat by means of massage," 1874, from massage (n.). Figurative sense of "manipulate" (data, etc.) is by 1966. Related: Massaged; massaging.

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delimiter (n.)

1960, in computing, "sequence of one or more characters used to specify the beginning or end of separate, independent regions in text or other data streams," agent noun from delimit.

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input (v.)
late 14c., "put on, impose," from in (adv.) + put (v.). Modern sense "feed data into a machine" is from 1946, a new formation from the same elements.
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spyware (n.)

"software used to obtain covert information about a computer's activities by transmitting data covertly from its hard drive to another computer," by 2000, from spy + ending from software in the computer sense.

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processor (n.)

"person or machine which performs a process," 1909, agent noun in Latin form from process (v.). Data processor is from 1957; word processor is from 1973; food processor in the kitchen appliance sense also is from 1973.

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-a (2)
nominative neuter plural ending of certain nouns and adjectives in Latin and Greek that have been adopted into English (phenomena, data, media, criteria, etc.). It also is common in biology in Modern Latin formations of class names (Mammalia, Reptilia, Crustacea).
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input (n.)
1753, "a sum (of cash) put in, a sharing, contribution," from verbal phrase; see in (adv.) + put (v.). Meaning "energy supplied to a device or machine" is from 1902, later of electronic devices; computing sense of "data fed into a machine" is from 1948, though this is perhaps from the verb in the computing sense.
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educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, "to draw out, extract; branch out," from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "bring into view or operation" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
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extrapolate (v.)

"make an approximate calculation by inferring unknown values from trends in the known data," 1862 (in a Harvard observatory account of the comet of 1858), from extra- + ending from interpolate. Said in early references to be a characteristic word of Sir George Airy (1801-1892), English mathematician and astronomer. Related: Extrapolated; extrapolating.

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