Etymology
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temerity (n.)

"extreme venturesomeness, rashness, recklessness," late 14c., from Latin temeritatem (nominative temeritas) "blind chance, accident; rashness, indiscretion, foolhardiness," from temere "by chance, at random; indiscreetly, rashly, recklessly;" probably, etymologically, "blindly," from PIE root *temsro- "dark" (adj.), source also of Sanskrit tamisra- "dark night," tamsrah "dark;" Avestan temah "darkness;" Middle Persian tar "darkness," tarig "dark;" Lithuanian tamsa "darkness," tamsus "dark;" Old Church Slavonic tima "darkness;" Old High German dinstar "dark," demar "twilight;" Old Irish temel "darkness."

The connecting notion would be "blindly, in darkness," hence "without foreseeing." Compare Latin tenebrio "dishonest person," apparently "person who operates in darkness" (see tenebrous).

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brunette (adj.)

of a woman, "dark in complexion, having a brownish tone to the skin and hair," 1660s, from French brunette, fem. of brunet, from Old French brunet "brownish, brown-haired, dark-complexioned," fem. diminutive of brun "brown" (12c.), of West Germanic origin, from Proto-Germanic *brunaz (from PIE root *bher- (2) "bright; brown").

As a noun, "woman with dark hair and eyes and of a dark complexion," from 1710. The metathesized form, Old French burnete, is the source of the surname Burnett. Burnete also was used of a wool-dyed cloth of superior quality, originally dark brown.

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dun (adj.)

Old English dunn "dingy brown; dark-colored," perhaps from Celtic (compare Old Irish donn "dark;" Gaelic donn "dull; dark brown; dark;" Welsh dwnn "brownish"), from PIE *donnos, *dusnos "dark." As a noun, "dun color," 1560s; as "a dun horse" from late 14c. The "horse" meaning is that the figurative expression dun is in the mire "things are at a standstill or deadlocked," which occurs in both Chaucer and Shakespeare. Dun also is likely the origin of the surnames Dunn, Dunne, Donne, Dunning, etc.

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subfusc (adj.)
"moderately dark, brownish," 1710, from Latin subfuscus, variant of suffuscus, from sub "under" (see sub-) + fuscus "dark, dusky" (see obfuscate). Related: Subfuscous "dusky."
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dye (n.)

"coloring matter in solution," Middle English deie, from Old English deah, deag "a color, hue, tinge," from Proto-Germanic *daugo (source also of Old Saxon dogol "secret," Old High German tougal "dark, hidden, secret," Old English deagol "secret, hidden; dark, obscure," dohs, dox "dusky, dark").

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tenebrous (adj.)

"full of darkness," late 15c., from Old French tenebros "dark, gloomy" (11c., Modern French ténébreux), from Latin tenebrosus "dark," from tenebrae "darkness," dissimilated from earlier *temebrai, from Proto-Italic *temasra- "darkness," from PIE root *temsro- "dark" (adj.), for which see temerity. Related: Tenebrosity.

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tenebrism (n.)
1959, with -ism + tenebroso (1886), in reference to 17c. Italian painters in the style of Caravaggio, from Italian tenebroso "dark," from Latin tenebrosus "dark, gloomy," from tenebrae "darkness" (see temerity).
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medievally (adv.)

"in a manner reminiscent or characteristic of the Middle Ages," 1844, from medieval + -ly (2).

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obscuration (n.)

1540s, "act of darkening; state of being made dark," from Latin obscurationem (nominative obscuratio) "a darkening, obscuring," noun of action from past-participle stem of obscurare "to make dark, darken, obscure," from obscurus (see obscure (adj.) ). 

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chiaroscuro (n.)
1680s, "disposition of light and dark in a picture," literally "bright-dark," from Italian chiaro "clear, bright" (from Latin clarus; see clear (adj.)) + oscuro (from Latin obscurus; see obscure (adj.)). Related: Chiaroscurist.
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