Etymology
Advertisement
vend (v.)
1620s, from Latin vendere "to sell, give for a bribe; praise, cry up," contraction of venumdare "offer for sale," from venum "for sale" (see venal) + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Related: Vended; vending; vendible (early 14c.). Vending machine is recorded from 1889.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
æ (2)

Anglo-Saxon alphabetic character representing a simple vowel corresponding to the short "a" in glad or the long one in dare, ultimately from Latin and used by scribes writing Old English because it represented roughly the same sound as Latin æ (see æ (1)). In Middle English the vowel tended to become -a- when short (glad, sad, from Old English glæd, sæd, etc.), -e- when long.

Related entries & more 
sacerdotal (adj.)

"of or belonging to priests or the priesthood," c. 1400, from Old French sacerdotal and directly from Latin sacerdotalis "of or pertaining to a priest," from sacerdos (genitive sacerdotis) "priest," literally "offerer of sacrifices or sacred gifts," from sacer "holy" (see sacred) + stem of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Related: Sacerdotalism "methods of priests; devotion to the interests of priests," in 19c. often in a bad sense, "priestcraft."

Related entries & more 
audacious (adj.)

1540s, "confident, intrepid, daring," from French audacieux, from audace "boldness," from Latin audacia "daring, boldness, courage," from audax "brave, bold, daring," but more often "bold" in a bad sense, "rash, foolhardy," from audere "to dare, be bold," which de Vaan says is derived from avidus "greedy" (see avarice). In English, the bad sense of "shameless, unrestrained by propriety" is attested from 1590s. Related: Audaciously; audaciousness.

Related entries & more 
traitor (n.)

c. 1200, "one who betrays a trust or duty," from Old French traitor, traitre "traitor, villain, deceiver" (11c., Modern French traître), from Latin traditor "betrayer," literally "one who delivers," agent noun from stem of tradere "deliver, hand over," from trans- "over" (see trans-) + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Originally usually with a suggestion of Judas Iscariot; especially of one false to his allegiance to a sovereign, government, or cause from late 15c. Compare treason, tradition.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
add (v.)
Origin and meaning of add

late 14c., "to join or unite (something to something else)," from Latin addere "add to, join, attach, place upon," literal and figurative, from ad "to" (see ad-) + -dere, combining form meaning "to put, place," from dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

The intransitive meaning "to do sums, do addition" also is from late 14c. Related: Added; adding. To add up is from 1754; in the figurative meaning "make sense," by 1942. Adding machine "machine to cast up large sums" is from 1822.

Related entries & more 
dace (n.)

type of small European freshwater fish, mid-15c., also dars, dase, dare, from Old French darz"a dace," nominative or plural of dart "dart" (see dart (n.)). So called for its swiftness. Another theory traces it to a Medieval Latin darsus "a dart," which is said to be of Gaulish origin. Also used of similar or related fish. For loss of -r- before -s-, compare bass (n.1) from barse and see cuss (v.).

Related entries & more 
data (n.)
Origin and meaning of data

1640s, "a fact given or granted," classical plural of datum, from Latin datum "(thing) given," neuter past participle of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). In classical use originally "a fact given as the basis for calculation in mathematical problems." From 1897 as "numerical facts collected for future reference."

Meaning "transmittable and storable information by which computer operations are performed" is first recorded 1946. Data-processing is from 1954; data-base (also database) "structured collection of data in a computer" is by 1962; data-entry is by 1970.

Related entries & more 
edition (n.)

early 15c., "version, translation, a form of a literary work;" 1550s, "act of publishing," from French édition or directly from Latin editionem (nominative editio) "a bringing forth, producing," also "a statement, account," from past-participle stem of edere "bring forth, produce," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -dere, combining form of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). "It is awkward to speak of, e.g. 'The second edition of Campbell's edition of Plato's "Theætetus"'; but existing usage affords no satisfactory substitute for this inconvenient mode of expression" [OED].

Related entries & more 
mandate (n.)
Origin and meaning of mandate

c. 1500, "a command, a judicial or legal order," from French mandat (15c.) and directly from Latin mandatum "commission, command, order," noun use of neuter past participle of mandare "to order, commit to one's charge," literally "to give into one's hand," probably from manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

Political sense of "approval supposedly conferred by voters to the policies or slogans advocated by winners of an election" is from 1796. League of Nations sense "commission issued by the League authorizing a selected power to administer and develop a territory for a specified purpose" (also used of the territory so specified) is from 1919.

Related entries & more 

Page 2