Etymology
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cut-away (adj.)

of coats, "cut back from the waist," 1841, from the verbal phrase; see cut (v.) + away. As a noun, "coat cut back from the waist," by 1849. In reference to models, drawings, etc., of which a part is cut away to reveal the interior, by 1946. The verbal phrase is from c. 1300 as "cut (something) off or away." 

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cut-out (n.)

also cutout, 1851, in reference to a kind of switch on a circuit to cut out an instrument, from the verbal phrase, from cut (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested from c. 1400 as "cut so as to take out;" from 1550s as "fashion or shape by cutting;" from 1736 as "remove, excise, omit." From 1640s as "be naturally formed or fashioned" (for some specified purpose).

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cuttable (adj.)

"capable of being cut or removed," mid-15c., from cut (v.) + -able.

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cutworm (n.)

larvae of certain moths, 1768, from cut (v.) + worm (n.). At night they emerge from the ground and cut off at the surface tender plants.

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cutback (n.)

also cut-back, "reduction" in expenditures, etc., by 1943, from the verbal phrase; see cut (v.) + back (adv.).

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clear-cutting (n.)

"felling and removal of all the trees in a place," 1874, from clear (adj.) + cutting (n.), verbal noun from cut (v.).

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woodcut (n.)
"engraving on wood, or a print made from one," 1660s, from wood (n.) + cut (n.).
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shortcut (n.)
also short-cut, "path not as long as the ordinary way," 1610s, from short (adj.) + cut (n.). Figurative use is attested earlier (1580s).
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cutty 

1790, "cut short" (adj.), from cut (v.). Also used as a noun of a variety of things: a short spoon, a short tobacco pipe, a pop-gun, also a dismissive term for a naughty or wanton woman or girl. Also used of a wren or a hare.

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cutting (n.)

mid-14c., "piece cut off;" late 14c., "act or fact of making incisions, action of cutting," verbal noun from cut (v.). Meaning "shoot or small bough bearing leaf-buds" is from 1660s. Meaning "slip cut from a newspaper or other print publication" is by 1856. Related: Cuttings.  Cutting-board is by 1819.

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