Etymology
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cut-out (n.)

also cutout, 1851, in reference to a kind of switch on a circuit to cut out an instrument, from the verbal phrase, from cut (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested from c. 1400 as "cut so as to take out;" from 1550s as "fashion or shape by cutting;" from 1736 as "remove, excise, omit." From 1640s as "be naturally formed or fashioned" (for some specified purpose).

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clean-cut (adj.)

"well-shaped, with precise lines," 1829 (of turf), from clean (adv.) + past participle of cut (v.). Compare clear-cut.

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cut-away (adj.)

of coats, "cut back from the waist," 1841, from the verbal phrase; see cut (v.) + away. As a noun, "coat cut back from the waist," by 1849. In reference to models, drawings, etc., of which a part is cut away to reveal the interior, by 1946. The verbal phrase is from c. 1300 as "cut (something) off or away." 

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incise (v.)

"to make a cut," 1540s, from French inciser (15c.), from Old French enciser "cut, cut out, slice" (12c.), from Latin incisus, past participle of incīdere "to cut into, cut open, engrave," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cidere, combining form of caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). In geology, of rivers, from 1893. Related: Incised; incising.

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incision (n.)

late 14c., "a cutting made in surgery," from Old French incision (13c.) and directly from Latin incisionem (nominative incisio) "a cutting into," recorded only in figurative senses, noun of action from past-participle stem of incīdere "to cut, cut through, cut open," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cidere, combining form of caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). Meaning "act of cutting into" is from early 15c.

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incisor (n.)

"cutting tooth," 1670s, from Medieval Latin incisor "a cutting tooth," literally "that which cuts into," from Latin incisus, past participle of incīdere "to cut, cut through, cut open; engrave," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cidere, combining form of caedere "to cut" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). Inscisours as the name of a cutting tool is attested from early 15c. Related: Incisorial.

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skive (v.1)
"split or cut into strips, pare off, grind away," 1825, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse skifa "to cut, split," from Proto-Germanic *skif-, from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split." Related: Skived; skiving.
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dice (v.)

late 14c., "to cut into cubes," from dice (n.). Meaning "to play at dice" is from early 15c. Related: Diced; dicing.

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dissection (n.)

1580s, "operation of cutting open or separating into parts," from French dissection (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin dissectionem (nominative dissectio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin dissecare "cut in pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Meaning "process of cutting open an animal or plant for examination of organs and tissues" is from c. 1600. Transferred sense of "act of separating anything into distinct parts for critical examination" is from 1640s.

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quadrifid (adj.)

"having four lobes; deeply cut, but not entirely divided, into four parts," 1660s, from quadri- "four" + -fid.

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