Etymology
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diamante (adj.)

"powdered glass or crystal," by 1904, from French diamanté, past participle of diamanter "to set with diamonds," from Old French diamant (see diamond). Diamante also was a Middle English form of diamond.

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endomorph (n.)

1940 as one of W.H. Sheldon's three types of human bodies, from endo- + -morph, from Greek morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Earlier, "a mineral encased in the crystal of another mineral" (1874). Related: Endomorphic.

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hornblende (n.)

common dark mineral, 1770, from German Hornblende, from horn "horn of an animal" (see horn (n.)) + blende (see blende).

The term "Hornblende" is an old German name for any dark, prismatic crystal found with metallic ores but containing no valuable metal (the word "Blende" indicates "a deceiver") [Herbert Bucksch, "Dictionary Geotechnical Engineering," 1995]

Related: Horneblendic.

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hyalo- 
word-forming element in scientific compounds meaning "of glass; glass-like, transparent," from Greek hyalos "glass, clear alabaster, crystal lens used as a burning glass," apparently a non-Greek word, said to be of Egyptian origin (glass was first made in Egypt).
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scry (v.)

"to see images in a crystal, water, etc., which reveal the past or forebode the future," intransitive, 1520s, a shortening of descry (v.1). Compare Middle English scrien "to describe" (mid-15c.), short for ascrien or descrien. Related: Scried; scrying; scryer.

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mesomorph (n.)

"person with a powerful, compact body build," 1940, from mesoderm + -morph, from Greek morphe "form, shape; beauty, outward appearance," a word of uncertain etymology. Coined by American psychologist William H. Sheldon (1898-1977); the reference is to the mesodermal layer of the embryo, from which physical structures develop. Related: Mesomorphic (attested from 1923 in chemistry, a separate coinage in reference to a state of a liquid crystal).

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quartz (n.)

common form of native silica or silicon dioxide, 1756, from German Quarz, Zwarc "rock crystal," from Middle High German twarc, probably from a West Slavic source, compare Czech tvrdy, Polish twardy "quartz," noun uses of an adjective meaning "hard," from Old Church Slavonic tvrudu "hard," from Proto-Slavic *tvrd-, from PIE *(s)twer- "to grasp, hold; hard."

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ladies (n.)

plural of lady (q.v.). Ladies' night (1880) originally was any event to which women were invited at an all-male club.

Every succeeding occasion is usually said to be "the best ever," but for true pleasure, comfort and genuine enjoyment it is doubtful if any occasion has been more truly "the best ever" than the ladies' night of the Paint, Oil and Varnish Club of Chicago, which was given in the Crystal ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, Thursday evening January 26. ["Paint, Oil and Drug Review," Feb. 1, 1911]
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juror (n.)
"one who serves on a jury," c. 1300 (late 12c. in Anglo-Latin), from Anglo-French jurour (late 13c.), Old French jureor "character witness, person who swears an oath," from Latin iuratorem (nominative iurator) "swearer, sworn census-clerk," agent noun from iurare "to swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law" (see jurist). Meaning "one of a group selected to award prizes, etc. at a public exhibition" is from 1851; this particular use seems to have arisen with the great Industrial Exhibition held that year at the Crystal Palace in London.
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exposition (n.)

late 14c., exposicioun, "explanation, narration," from Old French esposicion "explanation, interpretation" (12c.) and directly from Latin expositionem (nominative expositio) "a setting or showing forth; narration, explanation," noun of action from past-participle stem of exponere "put forth; explain; expose," from ex "from, forth" (see ex-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)).

The meaning "public display" is attested by 1851 in reference to the Crystal Palace Exposition in London. Abbreviation Expo is recorded from 1963, in reference to planning for the world's fair held in Montreal in 1967.

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