Etymology
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cross-over (n.)

also crossover, 1795, a term in calico-printing, "superimposed color in the form of stripes or crossbars," from the verbal phrase; see cross (v.) + over (adv.). From 1884 in railroading; from 1912 in biology. As a general adjective from 1893; specifically of musicians and genres from 1971.

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cross-stitch (n.)

1710, in needlework, "a stitch in the form of an X; two stitches, one crossing the other in the middle," from cross- + stitch (n.). As a verb from 1794. Related: Cross-stitched; crossed-stitching.

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cross-eyes 

also crosseyes, "want of concordance in the optic axes, strabismus, the sort of squint in which both eyes turn toward the nose," 1826; perhaps derived from cross-eyed (1770); see cross- + eye (n.).

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cross-dressing (n.)

also crossdressing, "dressing in clothes of the opposite sex," 1911, from cross- + dressing; a translation of German Transvestismus (see transvestite). As a verb, cross-dress is attested by 1966; the noun cross-dresser is by 1975.

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cross-fire (n.)

also crossfire, 1763, in military writing, "lines of fire from two or more positions which cross one another;" see cross- + fire (n.).

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cross-check (n.)

1903 in research and accounting, from the verbal phrase, from cross (adv.) + check (v.1). As a verb in hockey, "obstruct by holding one's stick across an opponent," from 1901; as a noun by 1968. Related: Cross-checked; cross-checking.

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cross-current (n.)

"a current running across another," 1590s, from cross- + current (n.).

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cross-legged (adj.)

"having the legs crossed" (usually of seated persons), 1520s; see cross- + leg (n.).

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cross-examine (n.)

"examine a witness (by the other side) to 'check' the effects of previous questioning," 1660s, from cross (adv.) in the sense "proceeding from an adverse party by way of reciprocal contest" + examine. Related: Cross-examination (1746).

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cross-country (adj.)

1767, of roads, "lying or directed across fields or open country," from cross- + country, or a shortening of across-country. Of flights, from 1909. As a noun, "outdoor distance running as a sport," by 1956.

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