Etymology
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cross-town (adj.)

also crosstown, "lying, leading, or going across town," 1865, in reference to New York City street railways, from cross- + town.

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cross-over (n.)

also crossover, 1795, a term in calico-printing, "superimposed color in the form of stripes or crossbars," from the verbal phrase; see cross (v.) + over (adv.). From 1884 in railroading; from 1912 in biology. As a general adjective from 1893; specifically of musicians and genres from 1971.

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cross-stitch (n.)

1710, in needlework, "a stitch in the form of an X; two stitches, one crossing the other in the middle," from cross- + stitch (n.). As a verb from 1794. Related: Cross-stitched; crossed-stitching.

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cross-eyes 

also crosseyes, "want of concordance in the optic axes, strabismus, the sort of squint in which both eyes turn toward the nose," 1826; perhaps derived from cross-eyed (1770); see cross- + eye (n.).

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cross-dressing (n.)

also crossdressing, "dressing in clothes of the opposite sex," 1911, from cross- + dressing; a translation of German Transvestismus (see transvestite). As a verb, cross-dress is attested by 1966; the noun cross-dresser is by 1975.

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cross-fire (n.)

also crossfire, 1763, in military writing, "lines of fire from two or more positions which cross one another;" see cross- + fire (n.).

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cross-check (n.)

1903 in research and accounting, from the verbal phrase, from cross (adv.) + check (v.1). As a verb in hockey, "obstruct by holding one's stick across an opponent," from 1901; as a noun by 1968. Related: Cross-checked; cross-checking.

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cross-current (n.)

"a current running across another," 1590s, from cross- + current (n.).

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cross-legged (adj.)

"having the legs crossed" (usually of seated persons), 1520s; see cross- + leg (n.).

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red cross (n.)

early 15c. as the national emblem of England (St. George's Cross), also the badge of the Order of the Temple. Hence red-cross knight, one bearing such a marking on shield or crest. In 17c., a red cross was the mark placed on the doors of London houses infected with the plague. The red cross was adopted as a symbol of ambulance service in 1864 by the Geneva Conference, and the Red Cross Society (later also, in Muslim lands, Red Crescent) philanthropic organization was founded to carry out the views of the 1864 conference as well as other works of relief.

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