Etymology
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mythopoeic (adj.)

"pertaining to the creation of myths, giving rise to myths," 1843, from Greek mythopoios, from mythos (see myth) + poiein "to make, create" (see poet). Related: Mythopoeist.

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prejudice (v.)

mid-15c., prejudicen, "to injure or be detrimental to," from prejudice (n.) and from Old French prejudiciier. The meaning "to affect or fill with prejudice, create a prejudice (against)" is from c. 1600. Related: Prejudiced; prejudicing.

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form (v.)
c. 1300, formen, fourmen, "create, give life to, give shape or structure to; make, build, construct, devise," from Old French fourmer "formulate, express; draft, create, shape, mold" (12c.) and directly from Latin formare "to shape, fashion, build," also figurative, from forma "form, contour, figure, shape" (see form (n.)). From late 14c. as "go to make up, be a constituent part of;" intransitive sense "take form, come into form" is from 1722. Related: Formed; forming.
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regender (v.)

also re-gender, c. 1400, "beget again, make or create afresh," a sense identified in OED as obsolete, from re- "back, again" + gender (v.) "bring forth, give birth." Related: Regendered; regendering.

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hell-raiser (n.)
1906 (to raise hell "create a ruckus" is from 1847, American English), from hell + agent noun from raise (v.). Related: Hell-raising. Probably not from the U.S. political cry "Kansas should raise less corn and more hell" (1900).
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benday 

also Ben-Day, by 1905, a printing and photoengraving technique involving overlay sheets of small dots or lines, used to create shadow effect, etc., named for U.S. printer and illustrator Benjamin Day Jr., who developed it c. 1879.

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shape (v.)

Old English scapan, past participle of scieppan "to create, form, destine" (past tense scop), from Proto-Germanic *skapjanan "create, ordain" (source also of Old Norse skapa, Danish skabe, Old Saxon scapan, Old Frisian skeppa, Middle Dutch schappen "do, treat," Old High German scaffan, German schaffen "shape, create, produce"), from PIE root *(s)kep-, forming words meaning "to cut, scrape, hack" (see scabies), which acquired broad technical senses and in Germanic a specific sense of "to create."

Old English scieppan survived into Middle English as shippen, but shape emerged as a regular verb (with past tense shaped) by 1500s. The old past participle form shapen survives in misshapen. Middle English shepster (late 14c.) "dressmaker, female cutter-out," is literally "shape-ster," from Old English scieppan.

Meaning "to form in the mind" is from late 14c. Phrase Shape up (v.) is literally "to give form to by stiff or solid material;" attested from 1865 as "progress;" from 1938 as "reform;" shape up or ship out is attested from 1956, originally U.S. military slang, with the sense being "do right or get shipped up to active duty."

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phanopoeia (n.)

1929, Pound's term for "a casting of images upon the visual imagination" in literature, from Greek phanai "to show, make visible, bring to light" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + poiein "to make, create" (see poet).

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mint (v.)

"to stamp metal to make coins," 1540s, from mint (n.2). Related: Minted; minting. Old English had the agent noun mynetere (Middle English minter) "one who stamps coins to create money," from Late Latin monetarius.

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reinvent (v.)

also re-invent, "invent again or anew," 1680s, from re- "again" + invent (v.). Especially "devise or create anew without knowledge of a previous invention;" phrase reinvent the wheel "do redundant work" is attested by 1971. Related: Reinvented; reinventing.  

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