Etymology
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omophagous (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the eating of raw food," especially raw flesh, 1857, from omophagia (1706), from Greek, "eating raw flesh," from ōmos "raw" (see omo-) + phagein "to eat" (from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share"). Related: Omophagic.

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omo- 

before vowels om-, word-forming element meaning "raw, unripe," from Greek ōmos "raw," from PIE root *hemo- "raw, sharp-tasting" (source also of Sanskrit amah "raw, uncooked, unripe," Armenian hum; Old Irish om, Welsh of).

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-yl 

chemical suffix used in forming names of radicals, from French -yle, from Greek hylē "wood," also "building stuff, raw material" (from which something is made), of unknown origin. The use in chemistry traces to the latter sense (except in methylene, where it means "wood").

It was introduced into chemical nomenclature by Liebig and Wohler when, in 1832, they used the term benzoyle for the radical which appeared to be the "essential material" of benzoic acid and related compounds. [Flood]
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ecru (adj.)
1869, "having the color of raw silk or unbleached linen," from French écru "raw, unbleached," from Old French escru "raw, crude, rough" (13c.), from es- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + Latin crudus "raw" (see crude).
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crudites (n.)

"mixed raw vegetables as a hors d'oeuvre," 1960, from French crudités, literally "raw things" (see crudity).

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*kreue- 

*kreuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "raw flesh."

It forms all or part of: 

creatine; creosote; crude; cruel; ecru; pancreas; raw; recrudesce; recrudescence.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kravis- "raw flesh," krura- "raw, bloody;" Greek kreas "flesh;" Latin crudus "bloody, raw; cruel," cruor "thick blood;" Old Irish cru "gore, blood," Middle Irish cruaid "hardy, harsh, stern;" Old Church Slavonic kry "blood;" Old Prussian krawian, Lithuanian kraūjas "blood;" Old English hreaw "raw," hrot "thick fluid, serum."

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recrudescence (n.)

1707, of wounds, "a becoming raw again, a breaking out afresh," a noun formed in English or French on classical models from stem of Latin recrudescere "re-open" (of wounds), literally "become raw again," from re- "again" (see re-) + crudescere, verb from crudus "raw" (see crude (adj.)), + inchoative suffix -escere. Meaning "revival" is from 1906. Related: Recrudescency (1650s); recrudescent (1726).

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recrudesce (v.)

in reference to wounds, also figurative, "become raw and exacerbated again, break out afresh," 1875, probably a back-formation from recrudescence or else from Latin recrudescere "become raw again, break open afresh." Related: Recrudesced; recrudescing.

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crude (adj.)

late 14c., "in a raw or unprepared state" (of coarse bread or untanned hide), from Latin crudus "rough; not cooked, raw, bloody," from PIE *krue-do-, from PIE root *kreue- "raw flesh." Meaning "lacking grace, socially unrefined" is attested by 1640s. Related: Crudely; crudeness. Crude oil, which is in its natural state and unrefined, is from 1865.

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squash (n.1)
gourd fruit, 1640s, shortened borrowing from Narraganset (Algonquian) askutasquash, literally "the things that may be eaten raw," from askut "green, raw, uncooked" + asquash "eaten," in which the -ash is a plural affix (compare succotash).
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