Etymology
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screwy (adj.)
1820, "tipsy, slightly drunk," from screw (n.) + -y (2.). Sense of "crazy, ridiculous" first recorded 1887. Related: Screwily; screwiness.
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meshuga (adj.)

"mad, crazy, stupid," 1892, from Hebrew meshugga, participle of shagag "to go astray, wander." The adjective has forms meshugener, meshugenah before a noun.

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crackhead (n.)

"crack cocaine addict," slang, by 1986, from crack (n.) in the drug slang sense + head (n.). In earlier slang, crack-headed meant "crazy" (1796), from the literal sense of crack.

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batshit 
also bat-shit, by 1967 as a variant of bullshit (n.) in the slang sense; from bat (n.2) + shit (n.). By early 1980s as "crazy," the sense shift is for uncertain reasons; perhaps from the notion of guano as an explosive or health problems caused by inhaling powdered bat feces in caves and mines. Also compare batty "crazy" (early 20c.), from the expression bats in (one's) belfry.
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dippy (adj.)

"mad, insane, crazy," especially in love, 1903, perhaps from dip + -y (2), but the exact signification is unclear. Another theory connects it with dipsomania.

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loco-weed (n.)
plant of the U.S. West, noted for its effect on cattle and horses that ate it, 1877; see loco (adj.) "crazy" + weed (n.).
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crunk (n.)

style of popular music developed in U.S. South in 1990s, by 1999; often said to be a slang contraction of crazy drunk; the identical word was used early in a slang sense of "cool, good."

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loopy (adj.)
1856, "full of loops," from loop (n.) + -y (2). Slang sense "crazy" is attested from 1923. The earlier figurative sense was "crafty, deceitful" (1824), popularized by Scott's novels.
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wacky (adj.)
"crazy, eccentric," 1935, variant of whacky (n.) "fool," late 1800s British slang, probably ultimately from whack "a blow, stroke," from the notion of being whacked on the head one too many times.
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cockeyed (adj.)

1821, "squint-eyed," perhaps from cock (v.) in some sense + eye (n.). Figurative sense of "absurd, askew, crazy" is from 1896; that of "drunk" is attested from 1926. Cockeye "a squinting eye" is attested from 1825.

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