Etymology
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disciplinable (adj.)

mid-15c., "amenable to discipline by instruction or improvement by teaching," from Medieval Latin disciplinabilis "docile." Meaning "subject or liable to discipline or correction" is from 1870, from discipline + -able.

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castigation (n.)

"punishment, correction, chastisement," late 14c., castigacioun, from Latin castigationem (nominative castigatio) "a correcting, reproof, chastising," noun of action from past-participle stem of castigare "to correct, set right; purify" (see castigate).

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corrective (adj.)

"having the power to correct," 1530s, from French correctif, from Latin correct-, past-participle stem of corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)). As a noun, "that which has the power of correction," from 1610s.

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thusly (adv.)
1865 (in an Artemus Ward dialect humor piece), from thus + -ly (2). A double adverb. Perhaps originally a humorous or mocking over-correction of thus; it has gained some currency but earns frowns for the user.
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reformatory (adj.)

"having a tendency to reform," 1704, from past-participle stem of Latin reformare "to transform, change" (see reform (v.)) + -ory. As a noun, "house of correction for juveniles who have already begun a career of vice or crime," from 1758.

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adulterous (adj.)
c. 1600, a classical correction (replacing earlier avoutrious "addicted to adultery," c. 1400), from obsolete verb adulter (see adulterer) + -ous. Related: Adulterously. Adulterine (1640s, from Latin adulterinus) was used in the sense "pertaining to adultery, born of adultery."
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bridewell (n.)

"prison," 1550s, from Bridewell, house of correction in London, originally a royal lodging (built by Henry VIII, given by Edward VI for a hospital, later converted to a prison) near Bride's Well, short for St. Bridget's Well.

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stet 

direction to printer to disregard correction made to text, 1755, from Latin stet "let it stand," third person singular present subjunctive of stare "to stand, stand upright, be stiff" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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stupendous (adj.)
1660s, correction of earlier stupendious "causing astonishment, astounding" (1540s), from Late Latin stupendus "to be wondered at," gerundive of Latin stupere "be stunned, be struck senseless, be aghast, astounded, or amazed" (see stupid). Related: Stupendously; stupendousness.
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revision (n.)

1610s, "act of looking over again, re-examination and correction," from French révision, from Late Latin revisionem (nominative revisio) "a seeing again," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin revidere "see again, go to see again" (see revise). Meaning "that which is revised, a product of revision" is from 1845.

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