Etymology
Advertisement
copycat (n.)

also copy-cat, derogatory term for one who copies another or another's work, by 1884, American English, probably at least a generation older, from copy (v.) + cat (n.). As a verb, "to slavishly imitate," from 1932. Related: Copycatted; copycatting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
photocopy (v.)

1924, "make a photographic reproduction," from photo- "photographic" + copy (v.). The usual modern meaning arose 1942 with the advent of xerography. The noun is recorded from 1934. Related: Photocopied; photocopying.

Related entries & more 
*op- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to work, produce in abundance."

It forms all or part of: cooperate; cooperation; copious; copy; cornucopia; hors d'oeuvre; inure; maneuver; manure; oeuvre; office; official; officinal; omni-; omnibus; omnium gatherum; op. cit.; opera; operate; operation; operose; optimism; optimum; opulence; opulent; opus; Oscan.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit apas- "work, religious act," apnas- "possession, property;" Hittite happina- "rich;" Avestan huapah- "doing good work, masterly;" Latin opus "a work, labor, exertion;" Greek ompne "food, corn;" Old High German uoben "to start work, to practice, to honor;" German üben "to exercise, practice;" Dutch oefenen, Old Norse æfa, Danish øve "to exercise, practice;" Old English æfnan "to perform, work, do," afol "power."

Related entries & more 
imitator (n.)

1520s, from French imitateur (14c.) or directly from Latin imitator "a copyist; a mimic," from imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").

Related entries & more 
imitative (adj.)

1580s, probably from imitate + -ive; or else from French imitatif, from Late Latin imitativus, from imitat-, stem of Latin imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
imitable (adj.)

1550s, from French imitable (16c.), from Latin imitabilis "that may be imitated," from imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Related: Imitability.

Related entries & more 
imitate (v.)

1530s, a back-formation from imitation or imitator, or else from Latin imitatus, past participle of imitari "to copy, portray" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). Related: Imitated; imitating. An Old English word for this was æfterhyrigan.

Related entries & more 
cc 

also c.c., 1936 as abbreviation of carbon-copy in business correspondence.

Related entries & more 
replica (n.)

1824, "a work of art made in exact likeness of another and by the same artist," from Italian replica "copy, repetition, reply," from replicare "to duplicate," from Latin replicare "to repeat," in classical Latin "fold back, fold over, bend back," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

Properly, a duplicate work made by the same artist and thus considered as an original, not a copy. General sense of "any copy, reproduction, or facsimile" is by 1865.

Related entries & more 

Page 2