Etymology
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import (v.)

early 15c., "signify, show, bear or convey in meaning," from Latin importare "bring in, convey, bring in from abroad," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." In English, the sense of "bring from another state or land," especially "bring in goods from abroad" is recorded by 1540s. As "be important" from 1580s. Related: Imported; importing.

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coach (v.)

1610s, "to convey in a coach," from coach (n.). Meaning "to tutor, give private instruction to, prepare (someone) for an exam or a contest" is from 1849. Related: Coached; coaching.

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derivate (v.)

"drain off or convey," early 15c., from Latin derivatus, past participle of derivare(see derive). Related: Derivated; derivating.

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alpenhorn (n.)
"long, powerful horn," formerly used to convey messages across valleys, 1864, from German, literally "horn of the Alps;" see Alp + horn (n.).
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purport (v.)

1520s, "indicate, express, set forth, convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended," from the noun in English and from Anglo-French purporter (c. 1300), from Old French purporter "to contain, convey, carry; intend," from pur- (from Latin pro- "forth;" see pur-) + Old French porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Related: Purported; purporting.

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port (v.)

"to carry, bear, convey," 1560s, from French porter, from Latin portare "to carry, bear, bring, convey," also figuratively, "betoken" (source also of Spanish portar), akin to porta "gate, portus "harbor" (from PIE *prto-, suffixed form of root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). The meaning "to carry (a rifle, etc.) in a military fashion" is from 1620s. Related: Ported; porting. The Latin verb is the source of many modern English words, including deport, export, import, report, support, important, and, ultimately, sports.

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schm- 
substituted for the initial sound of a word and reduplicated with it to convey derision (as in "Oedipus schmoedipus" in the punchline of the old joke about the Jewish mother and the psychiatrist), 1929, from the numerous Yiddish words that begin with this sound.
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truck (v.2)
"to convey on a truck," 1809, from truck (n.). Verbal meaning "dance, move in a cool way," first attested 1935, from popular dance of that name in U.S., supposedly introduced at Cotton Club, 1933. Related: Trucked; trucking.
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epexegesis (n.)
"words added to convey more clearly the meaning intended," 1620s, from Modern Latin, from Greek epexegesis "a detailed account, explanation," from epi "in addition" (see epi-) + exegeisthai "to explain" (see exegesis). Related: Epexegetic; epexegetical.
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parachute (v.)

"to descend or convey by or as if by the aid of a parachute," 1807, from parachute (n.). Marked "rare" in Century Dictionary (1895); it became more common 20c. Related: Parachuted; parachuting.

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