Etymology
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colloquium (n.)

c. 1600, "conversation, dialogue" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin colloquium "conference, conversation," literally "a speaking together," from com- "together" (see com-) + -loquium "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Also as a legal term; meaning "a meeting for discussion, assembly, conference, seminar" is attested by 1844.

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converse (n.2)

c. 1500, "acquaintance by frequent or customary intercourse," from converse (v.). From 1610s as "conversation, familiar discourse."

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sparkling (adj.)
early 13c., present-participle adjective from sparkle (v.). Of eyes and wines from early 15c.; of conversation from 1640s. Related: Sparklingly.
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colloquialism (n.)

1810, "a colloquial word or phrase," one peculiar to the language of common conversation, from colloquial + -ism. Meaning "colloquial quality or style" is from 1818. Sometimes conversationism (1853) was used.

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confab (n.)

"familiar talk or conversation, chatting," 1701, colloquial shortening of confabulation. Mocking variant conflab is attested from 1852, American English. From 1741 as a verb. Related: Confabbing.

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stock (adj.)
in reference to conversation, literature, "recurring, commonplace" (as in stock phrase), 1738, figurative use from sense "kept in store for constant use" (1620s), from stock (n.2).
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yack (v.)
also yak, "to talk, to chatter," 1950, slang, probably short for yackety-yacking "talk" (1947), probably echoic (compare Australian slang yacker "talk, conversation," 1882). Related: Yacked; yacking.
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jangle (n.)
late 13c., "gossip, slanderous conversation, dispute," from Old French jangle "idle chatter, grumbling, nagging," from jangler (see jangle (v.)). Meaning "discordant sound" is from 1795.
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talk (n.)
late 15c., "speech, discourse, conversation," from talk (v.). Meaning "informal lecture or address" is from 1859. Meaning "a subject of gossip" is from 1620s (in talk of the town). Talk show first recorded 1965; talk radio is from 1985.
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locutory (n.)
"room (in a monastery) for conversation," especially with those not connected with the monastery, late 15c., from Medieval Latin locutorium, from Late Latin locutor "a speaker," from Latin loqui "to talk" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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