Etymology
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neocolonialism (n.)

also neo-colonialism, "the exertion of influence or control over other nations, especially former dependencies, without direct military or political control," 1955, from neo- "new" + colonialism.

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AWACS (n.)
1966, initialism (acronym) for "Airborne Warning and Control Systems."
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fader (n.)
sound control device, 1931, agent noun from fade (v.).
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CDC 
abbreviation of Centers for Disease Control, renamed 1970 from earlier U.S. federal health lab, originally Communicable Diseases Center (1946). Since 1992, full name is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the usual initialism (acronym) remains CDC.
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joy-stick (n.)

also joystick, 1910, aviators' slang for the control lever of an airplane, from joy + stick (n.). Transferred sense of "small lever to control movement" is from 1952; later especially in reference to controlling images on a screen (1978). As slang for "dildo," probably from early 1930s.

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self-government (n.)

1734, of persons, "self-control;" 1798, of states, nations, provinces, cities, etc., "administration of its own affairs without outside direction or interference," from self- + government. Related: Self-governing (1680s); self-governed (1709 as an adjective, of persons, "marked by self-control").

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dominance (n.)

"rule, control; authority; ascendancy," 1819; see dominant + -ance. Perhaps from French dominance (by 1743). Related: Dominancy.

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self-discipline (n.)

"ability to restrain or guide or control oneself," 1690s; see self- + discipline (n.). Related: Self-disciplined.

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receivership (n.)

late 15c., "office of a receiver of public revenues," from receiver + -ship. As "condition of being under control of a receiver," 1884.

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command (n.)

c. 1400, "an order, a command; what is commanded or ordered," from Old French comand (14c.), from comander "to order, to entrust" (see command (v.)). Meaning "control, right or authority to order or compel obedience" is from mid-15c. Meaning "power of control, mastery" (of a situation, a language, etc.) is from 1640s.

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